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STATE BOARD RECOMMENDS 10 OHIO NOMINATIONS TO THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Members of the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board have voted to recommend that nominations for the following properties in Ohio be forwarded to the Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places for her consideration:

Belmont County / Blaine
Blaine Hill “S” Bridge
Old National Rd., Twp. Rd. 649

Crawford County / Bucyrus vicinity
Harvey One-Room School
1120 Caldwell Rd.

Erie County / Sandusky
Feick Building
158-160 E. Market St.

Franklin County / Worthington
Worthington Historic District
roughly bounded by North, South, Morning, and Evening Sts.

Geauga County / Materials Park
ASM Headquarters and Geodesic Dome
9639 Kinsman Rd.

Lorain County / Avon
Wilson-Falkner-Baldauf House
3260 Center Rd.

Miami County / Tipp City
Detrick Milling & Distillery Co.
128 W. Broadway

Miami County / Tipp City
Saunders Seed Co., Inc.
101 W. Broadway

Montgomery County / Dayton
Graphic Arts Building
221-223 S. Ludlow St.

Summit County / Akron
Main-Exchange Historic District
326-380, 323-337S. Main St., 12 E. Exchange St., and 1 W. Exchange St.

The board’s recommendations were made on Friday, August 28, 2009, during a meeting held at the State Library of Ohio in Columbus. As a result, nominations for each of the properties will be forwarded to the Keeper of the National Register, who directs the program for the U.S. Department of the Interior.

If the Keeper agrees that the properties meet the criteria for listing, they will be added to the National Register of Historic Places, with the exception of the Graphic Arts Building in Dayton.

The owner of the Graphic Arts Building has objected to the proposed listing, so instead the Keeper will issue an opinion as to whether the Graphic Arts Building is eligible for the National Register, called a “Determination of Eligibility,” but will not add it at this time even if it is found to meet the criteria for listing on the National Register. If determined eligible, the Graphic Arts Building may be added to the National Register at some future date if the owner removes the objection, or if a subsequent owner does.

Decisions from the Keeper on all 10 nominations are expected in about 90 days.

The board also approved the content of a study, “Historic Industrial Resources of Tipp City, Ohio, 1840-1956,” that, if approved by the National Park Service, too, will become a basis for deciding which 19th and early 20th century industrial buildings in Tipp City may be eligible for National Register listing.

About the National Register

The National Register lists places that should be preserved because of their significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. It includes buildings, sites, structures, objects, and historic districts of national, state, and local importance.

To be eligible for listing on the National Register a property or district must:

  • be associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history, or
  • be associated with the lives of people significant in our past, or
  • embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or represent the work of a master, or possess high artistic values, or represent a significant, distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction (e.g. a historic district), or
  • have yielded, or be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history.
National Register listing often raises community awareness of a property. However, listing does not obligate owners to repair or improve their properties and does not prevent them from remodeling, altering, selling, or even demolishing them if they choose to do so. Owners or long-term tenants who rehabilitate income-producing properties listed on the National Register can qualify for a 20 percent federal income tax credit if the work they do follows the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, guidelines used nationwide for repairs and alterations to historic buildings.

In Ohio anyone may prepare a National Register nomination. Nominations are made through the Ohio Historic Preservation Office of the Ohio Historical Society. Proposed nominations are reviewed by the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board, a governor-appointed panel of citizens and professionals in history, architecture, archaeology, and related fields. The board reviews each nomination to see whether it appears to be eligible for listing on the National Register, then makes a recommendation to the State Historic Preservation Officer. The final decision to add a property to the register is made by the National Park Service, which administers the program nationwide.

About the Ohio Historic Preservation Office

The Ohio Historic Preservation Office is Ohio’s official historic preservation agency. A part of the Ohio Historical Society, it identifies historic places in Ohio, nominates properties to the National Register of Historic Places, reviews federally-assisted projects for effects on historic, architectural, and archaeological resources in Ohio, consults on the conservation of older buildings and sites, and offers educational programs and publications. Background

At its August 28, 2009, meeting, the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board voted to recommend the following properties for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Additional background on the properties is available to be faxed or e-mailed on request. Contact Tom Wolf, (614) 298-2000 or 298-2396.

Belmont County / Blaine
Blaine Hill “S” Bridge, Old National Road, Twp. Rd. 649

The Blaine Hill “S” Bridge, a three-span stone-arch bridge on the old National Road, has been recommended for nomination to the National Register for its architectural significance as well as for its association with the development of transportation, the settlement of Ohio, and America’s westward expansion. Built in 1826, it served travelers on this route for over a century, and connects the town of Blaine to the top of Blaine Hill, crossing Wheeling Creek. It is one of four stone “S” bridges on the National Road in Ohio.

Crawford County / Bucyrus vicinity
Harvey One-Room School, 1120 Caldwell Rd.

Recommended for nomination to the National Register for its local significance because of the important part that it played in the education of children in Bucyrus Township from 1876 to 1918, Harvey School is a one-room brick schoolhouse constructed in 1876 on the site of an earlier log school building.

Erie County / Sandusky
Feick Building, 158-160 E. Market St.

The Feick Building has been recommended for nomination to the National Register as a reflection of the early 20th century commercial prosperity of Sandusky and for its association with local business and community leader George Feick. The first three stories were built in 1908 using the then-new steel skeleton form of construction that allowed more stories to be added. In 1923 five stories were added to accommodate ongoing retail and commercial growth downtown, making it Sandusky’s first eight-story building. Builder George Feick, Sr., was a leader in the development and commercial expansion of Sandusky.

Franklin County / Worthington
Worthington Historic District, roughly bounded by North, South, Morning and Evening streets

The proposed Worthington Historic District developed over 150 years and its architecture reflects this extended period of development. Buildings from the first decade of the 19th century still stand, along with houses, commercial, and public buildings from the late 19th and first half of the 20th centuries, with the most recent contributing structures in the district dating from the immediate post-World War II period. The architecture of the proposed historic district reflects growth and change in the community from 1803 to the early 1960s, a period that saw Worthington evolve from a frontier village to a market center for surrounding farms, then into a residential and commercial suburb of metropolitan Columbus.

Geauga County / Materials Park
ASM Headquarters and Geodesic Dome, 9639 Kinsman Rd.

Recommended for nomination to the National Register for its architectural and engineering significance, the American Society for Metals Headquarters and Geodesic Dome were built in 1959 and reflect the life-work and design philosophies of three men: prominent Cleveland modern architect John Terence Kelly; William H. Eisenman, a founding member of the society and its longtime national secretary; and R. Buckminster Fuller, world-renowned mathematician, philosopher, and engineer, who invented the geodesic dome. The complex expresses the simplicity, minimalism, clean lines, geometric shapes, and volumes associated with the modern movement in architecture. Together with its setting in Materials Park, it also reflects broader mid-20th century trends in American industry and in human use and understanding of the environment and the materials – specifically metals – found in it. As an uncovered structure that serves a purely aesthetic purpose, the dome is rare among Fuller’s designs. At the time it was built, it was considered the world’s largest openwork dome, and was noted for its design and craftsmanship.

Lorain County / Avon
Wilson-Falkner-Baldauf House, 3260 Center Rd.

Built in 1861, the Wilson-Falkner-Baldauf House has been recommended for nomination to the National Register for its local significance as an example of a 19th century farmhouse built of sandstone and rubble fieldstone quarried in the Amherst area. Finish-tool marks on the sandstone blocks demonstrate the skill of a master stone mason, and an ornate staircase, woodwork and mantel reflect the overall quality of materials and craftsmanship. The door and window surrounds and woodwork show the influence of the Greek Revival style popular in Ohio from the 1830s through the 1850s. These architectural details and features were photographed and recorded in measured drawings when the house was documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey in the 1930s.

Miami County / Tipp City
Detrick Milling & Distillery Co., 128 W. Broadway

Built c. 1900 as a whiskey warehouse, this four-story building was originally part of a large industrial complex operated by the Detrick Co., which was established in 1885 and added a distillery in 1897. With the advent of Prohibition in 1919 the distillery closed and the firm changed its name to Detrick Grain and Mercantile Co. Converted into a garage by the early 1920s, the building continued to be used by the Detrick Co. until 1949, when the company was sold. The National Register nomination is an outcome of a study of Tipp City’s industrial history from 1840-1956 and buildings associated with it, made possible by a Certified Local Government grant from the Ohio Historic Preservation Office of the Ohio Historical Society.

Miami County / Tipp City
Saunders Seed Co., Inc., 101 W. Broadway

The Saunders Seed Co. building has been recommended for nomination to the National Register for its association with Tipp City’s early 20th century industrial history. Built in 1906 by Eli Saunders, who operated the Tipp Leaf Tobacco Co., it has housed Saunders Seed Co. since 1922, which is still in operation at its original location, making it one of Tipp City’s oldest continuously operating industries. The National Register nomination is an outcome of a study of Tipp City’s industrial history from 1840-1956 and buildings associated with it, made possible by a Certified Local Government grant from the Ohio Historic Preservation Office of the Ohio Historical Society.

Montgomery County / Dayton
Graphic Arts Building 221-223 S. Ludlow St.

The Graphic Arts Building has been recommended for nomination to the National Register for its history of association with Dayton’s printing and publishing industry and for its local significance as an example of the commercial work of Dayton architects Schenck & Williams. Located in an area once known as Dayton’s publishing district, the five-story building, completed in 1925, has a poured-in-place concrete structure designed to be fireproof and carry the weight of heavy printing equipment and supplies. Generous windows take full advantage of natural daylight. It housed the Christian Publishing Association – founded in 1843 as the Ohio Christian Book Association – until 1936.

Summit County / Akron
Main-Exchange Historic District
326-380 and 323-337 S. Main St., 12 E. Exchange St., and 1 W. Exchange St.

South Akron’s commercial center, the Main-Exchange district has been recommended for nomination to the National Register for its association with the city’s early 20th century rubber boom, and for its local significance in the areas of architecture and engineering. By the 1910s, nearby industries like Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone, General Tire, and others collectively employed 38,000 workers producing about 40,000 tires a day to meet the demands of the growing automotive industry. The number of workers passing through the vicinity, and the resulting concentration of banks, insurance companies, real estate enterprises, health services, and commercial establishments there, made the intersection of Main and Exchange one of the city’s most important streetcar and trolley hubs. The Main Theatre, a movie house, opened in 1913 at the northwest corner of Main and Exchange, and the Stanley Dancing Pavilion opened upstairs in 1915, making Main-Exchange an entertainment and recreation center as well. In the 1920s the Akron, Youngstown, and Canton Railroad reinforced the area’s importance as a transportation center by locating its offices in the high-rise Herberich Building, completed in 1919. Many of the buildings in the proposed Main-Exchange Historic District were designed by leading architects of the time and are built of reinforced concrete, structural tile, and terra cotta, reflecting early 20th century innovations in fireproof engineering.

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Contact Tom Wolf, Public Education Manager, Ohio Historic Preservation Office, (614) 298-2000, or via e-mail: twolf@ohiohistory.org

Thank you for your interest in The Ohio Historical Society!

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