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Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board To Meet Dec. 4

Kent State Shootings Site Among Five Proposed Nominations for National Register of Historic Places

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)- The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board will meet on Friday, Dec. 4, 2009, at 10 a.m. at the Ohio Historical Center, I-71 and 17th Avenue, Columbus. At the meeting, the board will review five proposed Ohio nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. They include:

Akron, Summit County
The Gothic Building
102 South High Street and 52-58 East Mill Street

Logan, Hocking County
Logan Historic District
(See background for boundaries)

Cleveland Heights, Cuyahoga County
Grant Deming’s Forest Hill Allotment Historic District
(See background for boundaries)

Massillon, Stark County
Saint Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church
322 Third St. SE

Kent, Portage County
Kent State Shootings Site
Near intersection of East Main Street and South Lincoln Street

If the board finds that the proposed nominations appear to meet the criteria for listing on the National Register it will recommend that they be forwarded to the keeper of the National Register of Historic Places for her consideration.

The 17-member board, chaired by Nancy Otis of Celina, is appointed by the governor to advise the Ohio Historical Society and the state on historic preservation matters. It includes professionals in history, architecture, archaeology and other historic preservation related disciplines as well as citizens. The board meets three times each year to consider proposed Ohio nominations to the National Register of Historic Places and conduct other business.

About the National Register
The National Register lists places that should be preserved because of their significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. It includes buildings, sites, structures, objects and historic districts of national, state and local importance. To be eligible for listing on the National Register a property or district must:

  • be associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history, or
  • be associated with the lives of people significant in our past, or
  • embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or represent the work of a master, or possess high artistic values, or represent a significant, distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction (e.g. a historic district), or
  • have yielded, or be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history.
National Register listing often raises community awareness of a property. However, listing does not obligate owners to repair or improve their properties and does not prevent them from remodeling, altering, selling, or even demolishing them if they choose to do so. Owners or long-term tenants who rehabilitate income-producing properties listed on the National Register can qualify for a 20-percent federal income tax credit if the work they do follows the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, guidelines used nationwide for repairs and alterations to historic buildings.

In Ohio, anyone may prepare a National Register nomination. Nominations are made through the Ohio Historic Preservation Office of the Ohio Historical Society. Proposed nominations are reviewed by the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board, a governor-appointed panel of citizens and professionals in history, architecture, archaeology, and related fields. The board reviews each nomination to see whether it appears to be eligible for listing on the National Register, then makes a recommendation to the State Historic Preservation Officer. The final decision to add a property to the register is made by the National Park Service, which administers the program nationwide.

About the Ohio Historic Preservation Office
The Ohio Historic Preservation Office is Ohio’s official historic preservation agency. A part of the Ohio Historical Society, it identifies historic places in Ohio, nominates properties to the National Register of Historic Places, reviews federally assisted projects for effects on historic, architectural and archaeological resources in Ohio, qualifies communities for the Certified Local Government program and administers a competitive grants program for CLG communities, consults on the conservation of older buildings and sites and offers educational programs and publications.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
National Register of Historic Places forms and high-resolution photos of nominated properties and districts may be downloaded at http://www.ohiohistory.org/resource/histpres/programs/media.html.

The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board will consider the following properties and districts for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places at its Dec. 4, 2009, meeting. National Register of Historic Places forms and high-resolution photos of nominated properties and districts may be downloaded at http://www.ohiohistory.org/resource/histpres/programs/media.html. For additional information, contact Kim Schuette at 614.297.2314 (800.840.6131)/614.298.2000 or kschuette@ohiohistory.org.

Background Information on Proposed Nominations to the National Register of Historic Places

Akron, Summit County
The Gothic Building
102 South High Street and 52-58 East Mill Street

The Gothic Building, designed by Akron architect Frank O. Weary and built in 1902, is a four-story masonry former apartment/commercial structure located in the Akron central business district. The two-part building was constructed with stores on first floor and apartments on the upper floors. The Gothic is proposed for nomination because of the high level of architectural design and as a distinctive building type: an apartment building for the emerging middle class at the turn of the 20th century. Construction of the Gothic Building reflects Akron’s growth and economic development associated with its emerging rubber industry. It is historically important in its representation of Weary’s eclectic use of architectural styles: Italian Renaissance Revival, Tudor Revival and Arts and Crafts. Today, the Gothic is part of a federal and state tax rehabilitation project.

Cleveland Heights, Cuyahoga County
Grant Deming’s Forest Hill Allotment Historic District
Woodward Avenue, Lincoln Boulevard, Edgehill Road, Parkway Drive, Redwood Road, Forest View Drive, East Overlook Road, Berkshire Road, Yorkshire Road, Washington Boulevard, Cottage Grove Drive, Coventry Road, Euclid Heights Boulevard, Superior Road, Cedar Road

The proposed Grant Deming’s Forest Hill Allotment Historic District is an early 20th-century neighborhood in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, which represents the early suburban expansion of Cleveland and is an unusual surviving example of an early master-planned suburban development that embraced a diverse group of homeowners and renters. The neighborhood, marketed as Forest Hill, was built primarily on lands previously held by John D. Rockefeller and James Haycox. (It should not be confused with the Forest Hill subdivision (the Forest Hill Historic District, NR 1986) that Rockefeller later developed on the border of Cleveland Heights and East Cleveland beginning in the late 1920s.) The period of significance begins in 1909, when the Forest Hill allotment opened and ends in 1941 with the construction of the last pre–World War II residence. The 1,052 contributing buildings evoke real estate developer Deming’s suburban vision. Forest Hill is a fine example of the garden city suburban ideal that was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The neighborhood assumed a diversity of housing that included not only architect-designed single-family homes but also builder-designed homes, catalog kit homes and even a large number of two-family houses. Although most of the district’s houses represent the eclecticism prevalent in architecture of the period, Forest Hill comprises three dominant architectural styles: Craftsman, Tudor Revival and Colonial Revival.

Kent, Portage County
Kent State Shootings Site
Near intersection of East Main Street and South Lincoln Street

In 1970, student unrest was considered the major social problem in the United States. On May 4 of that year, Kent State University was placed in an international spotlight after a student protest against the Vietnam War and the presence of the Ohio National Guard on campus ended in tragedy when the Guard shot and killed four and wounded nine Kent State students. The May 4, 1970, Kent State Shootings Site is proposed for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places because of events associated with it, although they happened less than 50 years ago, were nationally significant. They caused the largest student strike in United States history, increased recruitment for the movement against the Vietnam War and affected public opinion about the war, created a legal precedent established by the trials subsequent to the shootings and for the symbolic status the event has attained as a result of a government confronting protesting citizens with unreasonable deadly force. As defined, the May 4, 1970 Shootings Site covers 17.24 acres of the Kent State campus comprising three areas: the Commons, Blanket Hill, and the Southern Terrace. The site is an irregular area within which the Ohio National Guard, student protestors and an active audience of observers and/or sympathizers ebbed and flowed across a central portion of the campus, beginning at approximately 11:00 a.m. and ending at approximately 1:30 p.m., May 4, 1970.

Logan, Hocking County
Logan Historic District
Roughly bounded by Second St., Spring St., Hill Street, Keynes Drive and Culver St.

The proposed Logan Historic District is representative of a southeastern Ohio town that was associated with industry and mineral extraction during the 19th and early 20th centuries. It is nominated to the National Register of Historic Places because of its association with the broad patterns of commerce, industry and settlement as well as for its intact collection of mid-1800s to mid-1900s architectural styles and building types. Additionally, locally produced clay materials are present in many locations in the historic district. Three eras of development occurred in Logan and the historic district reflects these eras: early settlement and the canal, the railroad and clay industry and the Depression and post WWII. The Logan Historic District contains a collection of historic resources that reflects the community’s development from its founding in 1816 to the mid-20th century. The district’s 278 contributing resources include commercial buildings, residential buildings, carriage houses or garages, civic or religious buildings, one structure, two historic sites and a historic monument.

Massillon, Stark County
Saint Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church
322 Third St. SE

Proposed for nomination because of its architectural significance St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church was designed by architect John B. Verment (1841-1911). Verment emigrated from France to the United States in 1873 and moved to Massillon in 1878. In 1891, he designed St. Joseph’s. The structure was completed in April of 1892. St. Joseph’s exhibits the visual complexity of late 19th-century church architecture associated with Victorian Gothic style in its asymmetrical elevation with prominent corner bell tower. The exterior is defined by large stained glass windows with pointed arched openings and tracery, brick buttresses with stone cap and pointed arched entrances. Significant architectural features also include brick corbelling and carved medallions and trefoils. The interior presents a large open sanctuary with rib vaulted ceiling and pointed arches at the niches and chancel. The transepts and window bays are defined by stylized fan vaults.


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