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Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board Meets April 7

19 Proposed Nominees for the National Register of Historic Places Will Be Considered

COLUMBUS, Ohio - The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board will meet on Friday, April 7, 2006, at 10 a.m. at the Ohio Judicial Center, 65 S. Front St., Columbus. At the meeting, the board will review 19 proposed Ohio nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. They include:

Akron, Summit County
Rhodes and Watters Apartment Buildings
16 Rhodes Ave. and 608, 610, 612, and 614 W. Market St.

Boardman Township, Mahoning County
Newport Village Allotment Historic District
4208, 4214, 4218, 4224-4230, 4300-4306, 4324, 4326, 4338, 4440 & 4416 Market St.; 27-155 Jennette Dr.; 41, 45, 49, 51, 55, 61 & 63 Overhill Rd.; and Chester Dr. excluding 4223 & 4225 Chester Dr.

Canal Winchester, Franklin County
Canal Winchester School
100 S. Washington St.

Chillicothe, Ross County
Anthony and Susan Cardinal Walke House
381 Western Ave.

Cincinnati, Hamilton County
West Fourth Street Historic District Boundary Increase
1-35 and 2-18 W. Fourth St.

Cleveland, Cuyahoga County
Cleveland Warehouse Historic District Boundary Increase, Schaber-Reinthal Picture Frame Factory (Sammy’s)
1384-1410 W. 10th St.

Superior Avenue Historic District
1700-2553 Superior Ave.

Coshocton to Marietta, Coshocton, Muskingum, Morgan, and Washington Counties
Muskingum River Navigation Historic District, originating at the confluence of the Walhonding and Tuscarawas rivers in Coshocton, flowing southeasterly through four counties to Marietta

Dayton, Montgomery County
Unit III, Dayton Project
1601 W. First St.

Kenilworth Avenue Historic District
700 Block Kenilworth Ave. and 1131-1203 Salem Ave.

“Fox Hollow”
6320 Mad River Rd.

Indian Hill, Hamilton County
Gordon E. Pape House, “Sunny Knolls”
8725 Blome Rd.

Lowell, Washington County
Lorenz/Vaughn Farm Historic District
7700 State Route 60

Marietta, Washington County (see Coshocton)

McConnellsville, Morgan County (see Coshocton)

Medina, Medina County
Spring Grove Cemetery
Springrove St.

Radnor, Delaware County
John Baker Tavern
4151 State Route 203

Springfield, Clark County
St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church
27 N. Wittenberg Ave.

Washington Court House, Fayette County
Washington Cemetery
1741 Washington Ave.

West Alexandria, Preble County
West Alexandria Depot
71 E. Dayton St.

Woodsfield, Monroe County
First United Methodist Church
136 N. Main St.

Zanesville, Muskingum County (see Coshocton)

If the board finds that the proposed nominations appear to meet the criteria for listing on the National Register it will recommend to State Historic Preservation Officer Rachel M. Tooker that they be forwarded to the Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places for her consideration.

In addition to the proposed National Register nominations, the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board will review a study of the history of Federal and State Correctional Institutions in Ohio. If approved by the board and subsequently by the National Park Service, the study will serve as a basis for nominating significant historic federal and state correctional institution facilities in Ohio to the National Register, although no properties are being nominated at this time.

The 17-member board, chaired by Kathleen M. Fox of Columbus, is appointed by the governor to advise the Ohio Historical Society and the state on historic preservation matters. It includes professionals in history, architecture, archaeology, and other historic preservation related disciplines as well as citizen members. The board meets three times each year to consider proposed Ohio nominations to the National Register of Historic Places and conduct other business.

About the National Register

The National Register lists places that should be preserved because of their significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. It includes buildings, sites, structures, objects, and historic districts of national, state, and local importance.

To be eligible for listing on the National Register a property or district must:
- be associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history, or
- be associated with the lives of people significant in our past, or
- embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or represent the work of a master, or possess high artistic values, or represent a significant, distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction (e.g. a historic district), or
- have yielded, or be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history.

National Register listing often raises community awareness of a property. However, listing does not obligate owners to repair or improve their properties and does not prevent them from remodeling, altering, selling, or even demolishing them if they choose to do so.

Owners or long-term tenants who rehabilitate income-producing properties listed on the National Register can qualify for a 20 percent federal income tax credit if the work they do follows the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, guidelines used nationwide for repairs and alterations to historic buildings.

In Ohio anyone may prepare a National Register nomination. Nominations are made through the Ohio Historic Preservation Office of the Ohio Historical Society. Proposed nominations are reviewed by the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board, a governor-appointed panel of citizens and professionals in history, architecture, archaeology, and related fields. The board reviews each nomination to see whether it appears to be eligible for listing on the National Register, then makes a recommendation to the State Historic Preservation Officer. The final decision to add a property to the register is made by the National Park Service, which administers the program nationwide.

The Ohio Historic Preservation Office is Ohio's official historic preservation agency. A part of the Ohio Historical Society, it identifies historic places in Ohio, nominates properties to the National Register of Historic Places, reviews federally-assisted projects for effects on historic, architectural, and archaeological resources in Ohio, consults on the conservation of older buildings and sites, and offers educational programs and publications.

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Background

The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board will consider the following properties for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places at its April 7, 2006, meeting. Additional background on the properties is available to be faxed on request. Contact Tom Wolf, (614) 298-2000, (614) 297-2340, or twolf@ohiohistory.org.

Akron, Summit County / Rhodes and Watters Apartment Buildings, 16 Rhodes Ave. and 608, 610, 612, and 614 W. Market St.

Located in Akron's West Hill neighborhood, the Rhodes and Watters apartment buildings are proposed for nomination to the National Register for their historic and architectural significance. Both are examples of the type of apartment buildings developed in Akron's most affluent neighborhoods during the boom years of the rubber industry. The Rhodes, built in 1912, is a three-to-four story reddish-brown brick building influenced by early 20th century architectural styles including Craftsman and Tudor Revival, distinguished by stacked porches that provide outdoor space for each unit. The Watters, built in 1925, is in the Commercial style, with a simple form ornamented by detailed brickwork.

Boardman Township, Mahoning County / Newport Village Allotment Historic District, 4208, 4214, 4218, 4224-4230, 4300-4306, 4324, 4326, 4338, 4440 & 4416 Market St.; 27-155 Jennette Dr.; 41, 45, 49, 51, 55, 61 & 63 Overhill Rd.; and Chester Dr. excluding 4223 & 4225 Chester Dr.

Platted by Newport Realty Co. in 1926-27, Newport Village Allotment is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its local historic and architectural significance. A planned suburban development, it was designed as part of a new village center intended to enhance residential development around newly-constructed Lake Newport in Mill Creek Park. The proposed district encompasses 144 buildings dating from 1927 to 1950, including commercial buildings on Market St. and duplexes and single-family homes on Chester Dr. and Jennette Dr. Covenants governed the size and appearance of houses in Newport Village Allotment, and most are in one of two styles popular at the time, Tudor Revival or Colonial Revival. Many were built in the 1930s. Many early residents of Newport Village were associated with Youngstown’s steel industry. The plan provides for commercial zoning on busy Market Ave. An alley behind it buffers a street of duplexes from noise and traffic, and the duplexes provide a futher buffer to single family homes.

Canal Winchester, Franklin County / Canal Winchester School, 100 S. Washington St.

Identified in a 1987 Ohio School Boards Association survey as the oldest continuously operating public school building in Ohio, Canal Winchester School is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its association with the history of education in the village. Built in several stages, the building reflects how legislative and philosophical changes over the history of education in Ohio have been implemented in Canal Winchester. The original two-story brick four-room school was completed in 1862. A second eight-room building was added in 1909, and a three-story building with a gym and auditorium was added in 1929, connecting the two earlier ones. Canal Winchester School continues in use today.

Chillicothe, Ross County / Anthony and Susan Cardinal Walke House, 381 Western Ave.

Proposed for nomination to the National Register for its local architectural significance, the Walke House was built c. 1812 and reflects the Virginia origins of many early Chillicothe settlers, who brought their building traditions with them. An important example of early 19th century Classical Revival style architecture, the house is one story on a raised basement, has a portico with classical columns, hipped roof, Palladian windows, fanlight, and classically-detailed fireplace mantels, all features associated with houses of the same time period in Virginia.

Cincinnati, Hamilton County / Gordon E. Pape House, “Sunny Knolls”, 8725 Blome Rd.

Designed by architect John Henri Deeken and completed in 1933, the Pape House is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its local architectural significance as an example of the Norman Revival, an early 20th century style inspired by the medieval farmhouses of Normandy. Its high hipped roof, circular stair tower, and leaded windows are characteristic of the style, which enjoyed brief popularity in Cincinnati's affluent suburbs during the 1920s and 1930s. The house is well preserved, with many original interior features. Ample landscaped grounds including a garden, pool, and pool house evoke the spaciousness of the original Pape estate.

Cincinnati, Hamilton County / West Fourth Street Historic District Boundary Increase, 1-35 and 2-18 W. Fourth St.

The proposed boundary increase would extend Cincinnati's existing West Fourth Street Historic District to include buildings between Race and Vine Sts. The area reflects the architectural development of retail buildings in downtown Cincinnati from 1856 to 1916, including the Shillito/McAlpin’s Building at 13-17 W. Fourth St. once occupied by two of the city’s leading Victorian-era department stores; one of Cincinnati's most architecturally distinguished tall office buildings, the 1916 Union Central Life Insurance Building at 1 W. Fourth St., designed by New York architect Cass Gilbert; and one of the preeminent Rookwood Pottery installations in the country, the Woodruff-Gidding Building at 10-12 W. Fourth St. Most of the buildings have well-preserved exteriors with such features as decorative masonry work, parapets, cornices, art tile, and metalwork.

Cleveland, Cuyahoga County / Cleveland Warehouse Historic District Boundary Increase, Schaber-Reinthal Picture Frame Factory (Sammy’s), 1384-1410 W. 10th St.

The proposed National Register nomination would expand the boundary of the Cleveland Warehouse Historic District to include the red brick building at 1384-1410 W. 10th St. that has housed Sammy’s since the 1980s. It was built in 1887 as the Schaber-Reinthal & Co. Picture Frame Factory, and was enlarged after a fire in 1907. Cleveland's Warehouse District developed from the 1840s through the 1940s, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Cleveland, Cuyahoga County / Superior Avenue Historic District, 1700-2553 Superior Ave.

The Superior Avenue Historic District is proposed for nomination to the National Register as the center of Cleveland’s garment industry in the early 20th century, a time when Cleveland ranked second only to New York City for women’s clothing manufacture. Also proposed for nomination to the National Register for its architectural significance, the district encompasses the Gothic Revival style St. Peter’s Church at 1700 Superior Ave., built in 1859; one apartment building; and a number of industrial loft buildings designed by some of Cleveland’s most important architects.

Coshocton to Marietta, Coshocton, Muskingum, Morgan, and Washington Counties / Muskingum River Navigation Historic District, originating at the confluence of the Walhonding and Tuscarawas rivers in Coshocton, flowing southeasterly through four counties to Marietta

Extending from Coshocton to Marietta, the Muskingum River Navigation Historic District is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its history as a 19th century slackwater navigation system designed to make the Muskingum navigable by riverboats. Built in the days before railroads were common, the project allowed steamboats to move goods between the Ohio & Erie Canal and the Ohio River. The system of dams and hand-operated wooden locks is, for the most part, still in its 1841 configuration and functioning after over 160 years. Believed to be the only remaining slackwater navigation system in the United States, it was designated a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1999. The earliest component, the Zanesville Sidecut - a pool that let boats go around the rapids - was built in 1816, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers finished its last major project in the system in 1955. The proposed historic district includes the actual navigation channel from bank to bank from Coshocton to Marietta, plus bridges; locks and dams; and the islands in the river and structures on them.

Dayton, Montgomery County / Unit III, Dayton Project, 1601 W. First St.

Unit III of the Dayton Project is proposed for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places for its connection with the 1942-1946 Manhattan Project and the development of atomic weaponry in the United States. The site comprises six modest buildings built by the Monsanto Company for polonium research and refinement that still have their original quickly built, wartime character.

Dayton, Montgomery County / Kenilworth Avenue Historic District, 700 Block Kenilworth Ave. and 1131-1203 Salem Ave.

The 700 block of Kenilworth in Dayton's Five Oaks neighborhood is proposed as a National Register historic district for its local significance in the history of architecture, community planning, and development. Architect-designed homes of the 1910s and 1920s on generous lots, and an emphasis on landscape features, distinguish Kenilworth Avenue from the nearby Dayton View Historic District. Planned to entice affluent Daytonians to leave downtown Dayton for the park-like setting on higher land north of the center city, especially after the 1913 flood, the development was shaped by advances in transportation including the Salem Avenue streetcar line and by improvements in city management and services.

Dayton, Montgomery County / “Fox Hollow”, 6320 Mad River Rd.

Fox Hollow, a property that has evolved with the countryside around it, is proposed for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places for its association with the history of Mad River Road in Washington Township, which evolved from a rural area in the 19th century to a setting for suburban ‘country homes’ of Dayton business and industrial leaders in the early 20th century. In the 1920s, Margaret Thacker Dickey transformed this early 19th century house into a Colonial Revival style country house and the property became the setting for foxhunts and social events. Dickey converted the barn into a theatre where the Junior League of Dayton began its theatre troupe in 1927.

Lowell, Washington County / Lorenz/Vaughn Farm Historic District, 7700 State Route 60

The Lorenz/Vaughn Farm Historic District is proposed for nomination to the National Register as an example of what farms in the Lowell area and Washington County were like from settlement of the area in the early 19th century through World War II. The well-preserved farm has been in the same family since 1911.

Medina, Medina County / Spring Grove Cemetery, Springrove St.

Established in 1883 to replace the Old Town Cemetery, a simple graveyard with markers set in rows that had been in use since Medina was platted in 1818, Medina’s Spring Grove Cemetery is proposed for listing on the National Register of Historic Places as an example of the influence of the 19th century Rural Cemetery Movement. Characteristic of the style, it features a carefully designed pastoral setting with trees, lakes, meandering roads, chapel and entrance gates, and private burial plots, planned as a place to be enjoyed by the living as well as to bury the dead.

Radnor, Delaware County / John Baker Tavern, 4151 State Route 203

Proposed for nomination to the National Register for its association with the early commercial development of Radnor (then known as Delhi) and Radnor Township, and for its mid-19th century architecture, the John Baker Tavern served travelers from 1849 to 1862 and is among the best remaining examples of a building type once common in the area.

Springfield, Clark County, St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 27 N. Wittenberg Ave.

Completed in 1897, St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its local significance as part of Springfield’s legacy of late 19th century Richardsonian Romanesque architecture and as an example of the work of local architects Charles and Edwin Cregar, designers of many major buildings in Springfield in the 1880s and 1890s. The congregation, formed in 1845, had grown to 500 members by 1889, prompting construction of a new church. Its German heritage is reflected in the German inscriptions in the stone and stained glass. The interior is trimmed in oak, with paneled wainscoting and oak pews. The Richardsonian style was named for 19th century Boston architect Henry Hobson Richardson, whose work inspired many emulators, including the Cregars. Richardsonian buildings are always massive and made of brick or stone, with round arches and rock-faced stone trim.

Washington Court House, Fayette County / Washington Cemetery, 1741 Washington Ave.

Washington Cemetery is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its significance as an example of 19th century landscape planning and cemetery design. Of the 52 acres in Washington Cemetery, 23.5 acres-the 1st and 2nd Tracts-are proposed for nomination to the National Register. The difference between the 1st and 2nd Tracts illustrates the evolution of the design of burial grounds that occurred in the United States in the mid-19th century. The 1st Tract, laid out in 1856, is typical of early cemeteries with burial plots arranged in rows with a flagpole in the center. The 2nd Tract, added in 1870, reflects the influence of the 19th century Rural Cemetery Movement with its curving driveways on hilly terrain.

West Alexandria, Preble County / West Alexandria Depot, 71 E. Dayton St.

Built in 1906, the West Alexandria Depot is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its local architectural significance as an example of a small town combination freight and passenger railroad station in the Stick Style, a Victorian architectural style most common in the 1870s and 1880s. Stick Style buildings are always wood, usually with both horizontal and vertical siding, set apart by an overlay of boards or ‘sticks.’

Woodsfield, Monroe County / First United Methodist Church, 136 N. Main St.

Built in 1898 and enlarged in 1907, Woodsfield's First United Methodist Church is proposed for nomination to the National Register for its local architectural significance. Reflecting the changing architectural tastes of the period when it was built, it features elements of the Richardsonian Romanesque style popular in the 1880s and the Late Gothic Revival style that began to eclipse it in the 1890s. The Barckhoff organ, which dates to 1907, was made in Pomeroy, Ohio; the congregation received a grant from Andrew Carnegie to buy it. The building is also notable for its Akron Plan Sunday School. One of Ohio’s contributions to the world of architecture, the Akron Plan originated at First Methodist Episcopal Church in Akron in the 1860s, with Sunday School rooms that opened via folding partitions onto a large common area, from which the superintendent could observe all of the classes at once, and allowing all to participate in a common opening and closing exercise. The Akron Plan and variations on it went on to become widely used throughout the U.S. from the 1870s into the early 20th century.

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  Contact
 

Tom Wolf, Public Education Manager, Ohio Historic Preservation Office, (614) 298-2000, or via e-mail: twolf@ohiohistory.org

 



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