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might be urged it does appear to me that the delegation of Ohio ought to insist on the President to cause to be erected on Lake Erie a force that would crush the enemy without the possibility of a failure as soon as the ice is cleared out. This in addition to its being the only secure means of rendering effectual the exertions of the people of the west will be a great saving of expence, for independent of the advantage of ridding ourselves of the annoyance of the enemy & considered only as a means of conveyance for provisions and military stores the savings in that respect will more than r:eet the expence of the building & on the termination of the war or in case of the being no longer necessary they will always sell for something.

There is one other difficulty attending the operations of the N W Army & I presume every other army in the union that is the present method of supplying our armees by means of contracts entered into betwreen the sec of war and indi- viduals for the supply of whole armies. These men are many of them unprincipled speculators enemies to the government and had rather see an expedition fail than succeed they are under no other responsibility than that of their contract and if they fail, we may after losing a campaign in consequence seek our remedy in the best way we can and such is the spirit:.of forgiveness that (as in the case of the merchants bonds) we will always find some way for the most infamous de- linquents to escape, While this system prevails no General can ever advance with confidence. It may do in a state of peace when if the provisions are de- layed the poor soldier has nothing to do but starve untill they arive. From what little reflection I have had on the subject it sticks me that [illeg.] so rwhat similar to the Comissary of purchases for military stores would be far more preferable, [illeg. there be less speculation & more certainty. For when supplies are purchase for an army solely with an eye to the pecuniary profit of the purchasers there will be little purchased when it cannot be had on terms comporting with that object.

These are times when supplies ought to be procured cost what it would. I am seriously apprehensive that the campaign to Detroit will fail for want of the necessary suply of provisions at all events it has and will be retarded - The fate of the troops under genl. Winchester is a severe comment on the want of military talents in the officers of our army, and the way in which they were appointed. To think of a man reciving the commission of a Brigadier Genl without ever advising the commanding Genl. of his intention to advance with a detach- ment of 900 men within 30 miles of the strongest point of eneries lines and re- main there from monday until Friday without the means of defending himself against an attack of artilery of which he was destitute, and at a distance of 40 miles from where any considerable force of our troops were assembled & 40 miles from the head Quarters at the time when succour was asked for It may be said that it was an evidence of courage, granted, but it was an unfortunate exhibition for tlhe troops and the country. Should the war continue for any length of time I fear the public will be convinced that legislative caucuses are not the best judges of military talents I could say much on this subject as respect this state but I shall omit it at present While on this subject, however, let me call your attention to Major Thos Rowland who was recommended for a major but who unfortunately for the service had to give place to Major Tod. Major Rowland has since raised a company of volunteers and marched to the river Raisin at which place lie was when Hull surrendered and by his indefatiguable exertions and soldier like conduct succeeded in bringing off the sick of the destardly flight of Capt Brush. The company being sent and dispersed he was unable to muster them again but determined not to quit the service himself he is now acting as aid to Genl Crooks of the Penn. Militia. Should the bill pass for the raising 20,000 additional troops and the government think proper to reward

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