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March 8, 1862
David J. Higgins, Captain, Company C, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Andrew Jackson, Tennessee. To Captain James B. Fry. Assistant Adjutant General, Department of the Ohio. Letter tendering the unconditional and immediate resignation of his commission as Captain in the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that he was requesting a discharge from the service because his honor and military character had been assailed by promoting an officer of lower rank to a position in the field of the regiment, because the circumstances of his family absolutely required his presence at home, his children being left without protection, and because his system was so bilious that he was assured the climate of the coming Spring would wholly unfit him for duty. Bears notes from Fred[erick] C. Jones, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, J[acob] Ammen, Colonel Commanding, 10th Brigade, and W[illiam] Nelson, Brigadier General, forwarding Higgins' letter. Also bears a note dated March 9, 1862, from James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General and Chief of Staff, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Nashville; stating that the letter was being forwarded to the Governor of Ohio so that Higgins' claims and feelings might receive such consideration as they merited, and that the General commanding had declined to accept Higgins' resignation.
2 pp. [Series 147-28: 27]

March 8, 1862
Edward A. King, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 19th U.S. Infantry, Headquarters, Indianapolis, Indiana. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he was sending to Buckingham, in charge of Lieutenant Ely of the 19th U.S. Infantry, two prisoners of war, Surgeon M.M. Johnson, 53rd Tennessee Volunteers and Surgeon H. Griffin, 50th Virginia Volunteers, who came to Indianapolis from St. Louis, Missouri upon parole to render professional services to officers of the Confederate army who were prisoners of war, that the officers having been sent to Columbus, there was no duty for their Surgeons at Indianapolis, and that Lieutenant Colonel [William] Hoffman desired him to say that the prisoners forwarded were not to be paroled at Columbus and that it was desirable that paroles, limited or otherwise, should not be extended to officers in charge at Columbus.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 13]

March 8, 1862
Stanley Matthews, Colonel, 51st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Nashville, Tennessee. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter acknowledging receipt of a commission to Sergeant Peter Lowe as 2nd Lieutenant in Company A; stating that the commission had been delivered, that in accordance with General Orders No. 3 dated January 28, 1862, he was about to forward the name of another person (Commissary Sergeant John G. Croxton of Company A) for said appointment, that Croxton was better entitled to the position on the basis of seniority and merit, and that since the appointment had already been made, no recommendation from him was necessary; asking whether the General Order referred to was still in force; and stating that he needed to know how to govern himself in such cases hereafter.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 56]

March 8, 1862
George W. Morgan, Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had just returned from Washington, that immediately before leaving Washington, he called upon General [James W.] Ripley, Chief of Ordnance, that Ripley informed him that Tod could now obtain at Washington, Louisville, or St. Louis, Austrian muskets for the ten regiments requiring arms (six in Ohio and four in the field), that the best and only efficient and sure arm issued to their troops were the Springfield muskets, that as a general rule, these had been reserved by order of General [George B.] McClellan for the Army of the Potomac, that from ten to fifteen thousand Springfield muskets were delivered at Washington (with more likely) and were there given to the Potomac troops in lieu of the arms first issued to them, and that he would respectfully suggest that a similar rule be adopted as to the Ohio troops.
2 pp. [Series 147-28: 17]

March 8, 1862
E[dward] H. Phelps, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Thomas, near Nashville, Tennessee. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending that the vacant field offices of the 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry be filled by appointing Captain William A. Choate of Company B as Lieutenant Colonel and Captain Charles Greenwood of Company A as Major; and stating that Choate and Greenwood were both good officers, and that their appointments would give general satisfaction to the regiment and be of more service to the country than any other appointments which could be made for the same positions. Bears a note dated March 10, 1862, from George H. Thomas, Brigadier General, Headquarters, 1st Division, Department of the Ohio, Camp near Nashville, forwarding Phelps' letter, and recommending both Choate and Greenwood as fully qualified. Also bears a note dated March 10, 1862, from D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Nashville, approving and forwarding Phelps' recommendation to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-28: 118]

March 8, 1862
LeRoy Pope, Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that on October 30, 1861, he was appointed as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry for the purpose of recruiting a company for said regiment, that he failed in the attempt, but had never been discharged from the obligations then taken, and that he now tendered his resignation and desired a written acceptance from Buckingham; and asking if he could get any pay for time and money spent in recruiting.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 69]

March 8, 1862
Ferd[inand] F. Rempel, Lieutenant Colonel, 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Adjutant General's Office. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter recommending Colonel [Valentine] B[ausenwein] for appointment as a brigade officer; and stating that Bausenwein's particular temperament was more adapted to such a position in the army, that there would not be so many small irritants subject to Bausenwein's attention and consequently it would keep him more cool and easy, that a Colonel of a regiment was hourly subject to many business calls of company officers, insufficiencies, etc., etc., all of which needed a cool attention to which Bausenwein was not habituated, that Bausenwein would make a very able brigade officer and would be in his element in that place, that he had been conversing with the Adjutant General on the subject and the Adjutant General requested him to speak to the Governor, that his position was very unpleasant being subject to a continual irritation and excitement for want of practical sufficiency and a modest, quiet manner of accomplishment, and that he did not complain and would do his part untiringly, but could no longer hesitate to inform the Governor.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 58]

March 8, 1862
Edward Spear, Jr., Captain, 15th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, Camp Tod, Paducah, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that General [William T.] Sherman, commander of the post, would furlough neither commissioned or non-commissioned officers for recruiting or any other service, that of course this was all right, but they wanted twenty sound, able-bodied, live artillery recruits on account of the "sad havoc" made in their ranks by the measles reducing them at Camp Dennison, that they left 19 men in the hospital at Camp Dennison and had as many more unfit for duty and with them, that from present appearances and the best medical advice, he did not think he could use these men for two months yet, that they had a "tiptop" battery otherwise, and that they were anxious to pitch in, but were very much crippled by the want of men; asking if Tod could send him the above number of men with their descriptive list and time of enlistment; and stating that he saw no reason why Tod could not appoint from this number an acting Sergeant to ensure their safe arrival, and that if Tod could comply with his request, it would be a personal favor and he hoped a public and national benefit.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 36]

[March 8?, 1862]
H.E. Symmes, Captain, Company C, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. To ? Letter stating that Captain Henry M. Black, 9th Infantry, U.S.A., Captain Charles C. Gilbert, 1st Infantry, U.S.A., Captain David A. Russell, 4th Infantry, U.S.A., 1st Lieutenant Caleb H. Carleton, 4th Infantry, U.S.A., and Captain William F. Reynolds on General [William S.] Rosecrans' staff were recommended (in the order in which they were named) by Colonel John S. Mason of the 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry as men in every way qualified to command regiments.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 101]

[March 8?, 1862]
H.E. Symmes, Captain, Company C, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, et. al. To Governor David Tod. Letter signed by six officers of the 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; imploring Tod to appoint an officer from the regular army to the command of the 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Colonel Samuel H. Dunning; and stating that the more rigid a disciplinarian appointed, the greater would be the efficiency of the regiment, and that they trusted no rules of etiquette had been broken by addressing Tod.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 102]

March 8, 1862
George Turner. To Sir. Letter requesting a pass to enable him to rejoin his regiment. Portion of letter missing.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 189]

March 8, 1862
John W. Wheeler, Lieutenant, 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Paducah, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that in pursuance of an order issued by Tod on March 3, he brought thirty-nine men to Paducah and had given them over to Colonel William Mungen, 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 22]

March 9, 1862
James Barnett, Colonel, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, Headquarters, Camp Jackson, near Nashville, Tennessee. To R. Hume, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter requesting certain commissions. Portion of letter missing.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 165]

March 9, 1862
E[phraim] R. Eckley, Colonel, M[atthias] H. Bartilson, Lieutenant Colonel, Lieutenant C[lark] H. Robinson, Quartermaster, Daniel Korns, 1st Lieutenant, Company K, and H[enry] C. Robinson, 2nd Lieutenant, Company K, 80th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Paducah. To ? Letter recommending Thomas C. Morris for the Captaincy of Company K; and stating that said position was made vacant by the resignation of Captain J[ohn] H. Gardner, that Morris was a gentleman and an accomplished officer, that Morris had experience and had seen service, and that Morris' appointment would give entire satisfaction to Company K and add to the efficiency of the service.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 67]

March 9, 1862
O[liver] D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Extract from Special Orders No. 64, stating that the resignations of 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant J[ames] B. Creviston, 40th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 2nd Lieutenant Samuel H. Cole, Company F, 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry were accepted to take effect on March 9, 1862. By command of Brigadier General [Don Carlos] Buell.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 80]

March 9, 1862
W. Angelo Powell, Topographical Engineer, Hagerstown, Maryland. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that in reply to his application for a commission as Captain, he had received General Order No. 3, that the justice of the order was most sincerely acknowledged, that he begged leave to say that in his absence from Ohio under General [William S.] Rosecrans, he had encountered dangers and privations and lost by this absence the opportunity to be now in the ranks of the Ohio troops, that he trusted his prior experience in the military sciences coupled with his experience in the field was such that he would not be debarred from securing a commission as Major, and that he trusted his military education, feelings, recommendations, and practical devotedness to the Union cause would meet with proper reward.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 54]

March 9, 1862
A[lvin] C. Voris, Lieutenant Colonel, 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Martinsburgh, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Tod was aware of the anxious desire of many of the officers of the 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to rid themselves of the impostor who, by some great misfortune, became Colonel of the regiment, that they had every reason to believe that Tod fully sympathized with them in their efforts to extricate themselves from their unfortunate condition, that fearing they might feel called upon to invoke the influence of the State authorities represented by Tod to aid them, he thought it not inappropriate to address Tod again, that the memorial sent to Tod by the eight Captains was delivered to the late General [Frederick W.] Lander a week before he died, that he might not act hastily in the matter, Lander referred the memorial and accompanying papers to a committee of three army officers (Colonel [John S.] Mason, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel [Samuel S.] Carroll, 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Colonel [Charles] Candy, 66th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry), that a hearing was held and a unanimous report made that all the charges were susceptible of proof, that before this, Colonel [Otto] Burstenbinder had been put on a detail for a general court martial to try Colonel Anisansel, that Lander was very unwell and projecting an expedition towards Winchester, that the court had hardly been dissolved before Lander died, that temporary command of the division fell upon Colonel [Nathan] Kimball of the 14th Indiana Regiment, that Kimball told him some days since that he had been unable to attend to the matter, but would do so at his earliest opportunity, that they were at Martinsburgh and Kimball was on his way there, that Kimball would most likely be their Brigadier and it was hoped he would do justice to them, that Kimball had promised a full hearing as soon as he arrived, that there were so many perplexing delays that the 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry felt very despondent about the matter, that the Colonel [Otto Burstenbinder] thought the matter had passed away and was offering indignities and impositions upon the line officers, that this should be stopped at once, that Burstenbinder knew who complained about him and had threatened to get rid of them, that many of those who complained had been put under arrest by order of Burstenbinder for fancied or most trifling offences, that if matters should continue this way much longer, he would request that a commissioner be sent by Tod to represent the claims of the regiment to the proper authorities, that their officers were subordinate to Burstenbinder and Tod knew what subordination meant in the service in times of war, that their officers disliked putting themselves too much under Burstenbinder's ire, that he was Lieutenant Colonel and his acts would be viewed with jealousy on account of his position, that he had, however, made up his mind to do all in his power, that honor would fully justify, to bring about a correction of the evils surrounding the command of the regiment, even if he should personally go under in the operation, that to fortify himself, he did respectfully ask that so far as his actions in that regard were sustained by discretion, they might also be sustained and protected by the Chief Executive of his own State, that he saw the difficulties in the way, but was bound to meet and overcome them, that if he did not meet with proper success, he hoped Tod would think it proper to send some good man to look after their interests which were the interests of the State and Country, that he would be glad to see Tod's Judge Advocate General (the Honorable L. Day) execute Tod's wishes in that regard, that it was intolerable and debasing to them to be treated as they were, that if he did not believe there was speedy justice awaiting them and if he did not regard the wishes of the good men who composed the 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he would at once resign because he could do the service no adequate good for the bonus given him by the government, and that he hoped he would be sustained by Tod in any prudently directed efforts he might put forth in behalf of the regiment, even if he should be a little importunate.
3 pp. [Series 147-28: 26]

March 9, 1862
J.M. Wright, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Nashville, Tennessee. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Extract from Special Orders No. 9, stating that the resignations of 1st Lieutenant Ransom P. Osborne, 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 2nd Lieutenant J. Squire, Jr., 21st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry were accepted to take effect on March 9, 1862. By command of General [Don Carlos] Buell.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 84]

March 9, 1862
Joseph P. Wright, Assistant Surgeon, U.S. Army, and Medical Purveyor, Department of the Ohio, Medical Purveyor's Office, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter asking how many regiments of Ohio volunteers were now organizing and which regiments had already completed their organization.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 62]

March 10, 1862
L.C. Brown, Assistant Post Surgeon, Post Hospital, Camp Chase, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To ? Letter stating that he had discharged James D. Jeffrys, Company E, 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, James H. Gardner, Company I, 68th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Jeremiah Baker, Company I, 72nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, William Williman, Company G, 68th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and John Reed, Company H, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry from the Post Hospital at Camp Chase to rejoin their regiments.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 71]

March 10, 1862
Samuel Clarke, Roscoe, Coshocton County, Ohio. To F. Myers, State Quartermaster. Letter stating that he was a member of Company F, 80th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he was detailed at Roscoe to get some straggling soldiers and his Captain forgot to give him a pass, and that he wanted to join his company, but had no money to pay his way on the railroad from Roscoe to Cairo, Illinois where his regiment was located; requesting that Myers send him a pass so he could go forward to his company; and citing A[ndrew] J. Wilkins, State Representative from Coshocton County, and A[rmistead] T. Ready, State Senator as references regarding his veracity.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 37]

March 10, 1862
J[acob] D. Cox, Brigadier General Commanding, Headquarters, District of the Kanawha, Charleston, Virginia. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter acknowledging receipt of Buckingham's letter of March 4 in reference to the filling up of the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that he had supposed that in the consolidation recently made of numerous Ohio regiments, the whole force was in such a sense at the disposal of the Governor, that it was forgetfulness of the condition of the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry on Buckingham's part which had caused the long delay in getting the needful companies for it, that Buckingham's letter showed that this was not the fact and he took pleasure in making the proper acknowledgement, that Captain [Alexander] Duncan of Company B of the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was going to Ohio to try to obtain one of the companies of the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry said to be disbanded or about to be, that if this was so, he begged that Buckingham would give Duncan every aid in his power, that he was desirous that the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry should be made full, that no regiment had done harder or longer service, and that having many of the qualifications of veterans, he was sure the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry would give a good account of itself if it went into the field that Spring strong handed.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 122]

March 10, 1862
John Garrett, Bellair, Belmont County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter regarding certain activities of David Rankin in raising a company; demanding that there be a fair election in the company; and stating that if certain men were commissioned without a fair election, he would take his boys from the company. Portion of letter missing.
4 pp. [Series 147-28: 172]

March 10, 1862
Joseph C. Glarden, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter asking how to obtain his pay, allowances for transportation, and subsistence during his three months' service in Company G, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 52]

March 10, 1862
H[enry] F. Hyman, Captain, [Battery I, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery], Clarksburgh, Virginia. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that Lieutenant [Joseph D.] King was, by an order from General [William S.] Rosecrans, transferred to Battery I, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery with the understanding that he would be a 1st Lieutenant, that he agreed to this, that King claimed to have over seventy men, that with such an addition, he hoped to get two more guns and have an eight-gun battery, that when the men arrived, King was not with them, that King came three days afterward and had only forty-six men, that when the men were divisioned to the different guns, King said he was to have two Lieutenants, that having already written to Buckingham for the fourth Lieutenant, he did not know what to do, that in accordance with the general orders sent from Washington, all officers appointed either from non-commissioned officers or Privates had to be recommended by the officer commanding the company and approved by the commander of the regiment, that he had written to Colonel [James] Barnett and Buckingham on the subject, and the person recommended was well worthy of the situation, that to his knowledge, the individual King wanted was a private soldier who knew nothing about artillery, and that none of King's men could drill.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 38]

March 10, 1862
L.M. Jewett, Headquarters, 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Medill. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter asking if an order had been issued by Buckingham's department instructing recruiting officers to send their recruits to camp for subsistence as soon as ten men were recruited; and stating that if such an order had been issued, he thought it would be a benefit to the public service for all concerned to become aware of the same, and that they had a number of men recruiting for the 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry who had ten men and were either disobeying instructions or not aware of the existence of such an order. Portion of letter missing.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 190]

March 10, 1862
J[ohn] Kennett, Colonel, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Headquarters, Camp Jackson. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he was in receipt of commissions for William Welshear, James Thompson, and Carl Adae, that Thompson and Adae should have been commissioned for 2nd Lieutenancies, that Welshear was acting in the capacity of Quartermaster of the 1st Battalion, that [Albert C.] Stickney was to act as Quartermaster of the 2nd Battalion, but he was informed someone by the name of Simonton at Columbus had the appointment, that he never heard of the appointment before leaving Bacon Creek, [Kentucky], that it had never been reported to him and Stickney had been acting ever since the formation of the regiment, that he thought it but just that Stickney should receive the position, that Lieutenant Wilson Cross was elected 2nd Lieutenant of Company B and had never received his commission, that he had written several times about the matter, and that Lieutenant E.W. Mitchell was registered as belonging to Company B, but he was acting as aide to Brigadier General O[rmsby] M. Mitchel under the commission; and requesting that a commission dated December 6, 1861, be made out for Wilson Cross as 2nd Lieutenant for Company B, and that a commission dated October 1, 1861, be made out for Albert C. Stickney as 1st Lieutenant of the 2nd Battalion to act as Quartermaster.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 123]

March 10, 1862
A.F. McMillan, Recruiting Officer, 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Austinburgh, Ashtabula County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter returning his appointment; and stating that he was disappointed in funds.
1 p. [Series 147-28: 186]

March 10, 1862
J.L. Miner, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that his son (Charles W. Miner) received a commission as 1st Lieutenant in the 21st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry from Governor William Dennison dated January 9, 1862, that he fitted his son out, that as soon as his son received orders, he reported himself to the Colonel of the regiment at its headquarters near Nashville, Tennessee, that his son returned home that morning and reported that the Colonel refused to receive him, that his son conferred with General [Ormsby M.] Mitchel at Nashville, that Mitchel told his son at the first interview that the Colonel must receive him, that after conferring with the Colonel and learning there was no vacancy in the regiment, Mitchel yielded the point, that his son, finding expenses heavy in that part of the country and his money rapidly disappearing with the prospect of drawing pay not promising, turned his face homeward, that he had been most unfortunate in his efforts to get his son into active service, that for a year prior to the breaking out of "this infernal Rebellion" in open war, his son had been a member of the Cincinnati Zouave Guards where he was a well-drilled soldier possessing a good knowledge of military matters, that when the war began, his son at once enlisted as a Private and became attached to the 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), that his son served over four months in eastern Virginia, winding up at Bull Run where he performed the most daring and gallant act of any man or officer in the two Ohio regiments, that this act had never been paraded in the newspapers nor reported by any of his son's officers because none of them were witnesses to it, that during this service, he sought to have his son appointed a Lieutenant in the regular army, that as he had not kept the first and greatest commandment of [Salmon P.] Chase, namely "Thou shalt have none other Gods before me", the application was defeated, that after his son returned home in August, he spent a good deal of time during the Summer and Fall and much more money than could be conveniently spared in trying to recruit a company and secure a position, that not being very apt in said business and laboring under a good many disadvantages, his son did not succeed, that when [Edwin] Stanton came into the War Department, he sent word that he had placed Charles' name first on the list and intended to provide for him as soon as there was an opening, that he replied informing Stanton that Charles had accepted a commission in the volunteer service, but desired to make soldiering a profession and to be transferred to the regular service, that a few days before, a letter was received from Stanton saying he had tried every way to provide for Charles as deserved, but that by the regulations of the army, Charles could not be transferred from the volunteer to the regular service, that it seemed by accepting the commission kindly offered by Governor William Dennison, his son had lost the opportunity of getting one in the regular service, that he did not know what, under the circumstances, was to be done, but trusted the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio would know, that his son had to be in the service, that his son had gotten a taste for war and was intelligent, that he thought his son was especially well versed in military matters given his age and would distinguish himself if he had a chance, that his son inherited more of the talent and traits of character of John C. Wright than any one of his descendants, that if his son held his present commission and especially if he was to receive pay, which he needed, he must of course do duty, and that the duty his son was best fitted for was active service in the field.
4 pp. [Series 147-28: 45]

March 10, 1862
George W. Morgan, Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the law required that the commander of a brigade should select his aides-de- camp from the line of the regular or volunteer forces, that as he was a Brigadier, he must act on the presumption that he would only have command of a brigade and would therefore be governed by said law, that he would be very glad if Tod would confer a commission as Captain of cavalry or infantry on Charles O. Joline, that Joline was Adjutant of the 2nd Ohio Volunteers under his command in Mexico, that he desired to appoint Joline as his aide-de-camp, that if there was a second vacancy of the grade of Captain, he would be glad if Tod would also retain it, that he wished Captains for the reason that he would doubtless be assigned to a division and entitled to three aides-de-camp, that the third he could not fill until his command was assigned to him, and that Joline would be in Columbus on Friday next.
3 pp. [Series 147-28: 17]

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