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February 15, 1862
George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington. To the Honorable John Sherman, U.S. Senator. Letter stating that upon the recommendation and at the request of Sherman and the Honorable James R. Morris, the Secretary of War authorized Dr. H[enry] T. Grier, who resigned his commission as Surgeon of the 30th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to re-enter the military service of the United States provided the Governor of Ohio might think it proper to re-commission him to fill a vacancy in one of the Ohio regiments.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 63]

February 15, 1862
N[ewton] Schleich, Colonel, 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Circleville, Pickaway County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter recommending the appointment of John Block of Circleville as 2nd Lieutenant in the 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that Block be assigned Fayette County and Pickaway County as his recruiting station. Bears a note also recommending James Griffith of Circleville.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 1]

February 17, 1862
Lewis D. Campbell, Colonel, 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, et. al., Headquarters, Camp Hamilton. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter signed by twenty-six officers of the 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that the regiment was now composed of seven companies, each numbering from 87 to 100 able bodied men who were sufficiently well drilled to render good service in the field, that considering the influences which prevailed in the region and the obstacles to recruiting which existed, they believed that the three additional companies could not soon be raised locally and that much longer delay in going into active service would tend to the demoralization of the troops that were now good, that they therefore requested an order to remove their camp forthwith into Tennessee for the purpose of filling up their ranks and rendering such other services as their country might require, and that if the 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry must be broken up, they desired that it be done while in defense of the "Old Flag" by and under the guns of its enemy.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 13]

February 17, 1862
James H. Goodman, Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Chase, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he was not in the habit of troubling those in power, but he desired to call Tod's attention to a matter in which he thought injustice had been done him, that he had volunteered as a Private on the first call of the President for troops to suppress the "wicked" rebellion, that he took a company to Camp Jackson where it was attached to the 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), that when the regiment was organized, without any solicitation of his own, he was elected and commissioned Major and went into camp for drill, etc., that when the call for three years' troops was made, their regiment re-enlisted, that a new election was held and he was unanimously re-elected Major, that they were the second regiment ready for the field in the three years' service, that they entered Virginia with General [George B.] McClellan and had been in every battle fought there since, save those on the Kanawha and on Cheat Mountain, that the 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had a reputation that Ohio need not be ashamed of, that he had commanded the regiment a large share of the time, owing to the sickness, death, and absence of other field officers, and was now in command of it, that Colonel [John S.] Mason had been detailed by General [Frederick W.] Lander as chief of artillery, that it would seem he ought to outrank officers of his own grade of recent appointment who had no experience or experience in inferior places, that all superiors with whom he had been associated acknowledged his capacity and fitness for command, that Colonel [James] Cantwell of the 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been their Lieutenant Colonel, that Cantwell left them last October to get up his present regiment, that Cantwell retained his commission in their regiment as Lieutenant Colonel, but he actually performed the duties of the office, that Cantwell was mustered out of service in their regiment on January 1, 1862, to take effect on December 10, 1861, that he was appointed Cantwell's successor as Lieutenant Colonel on January 9, 1862, without making the commission take effect back to the time the vacancy occurred as was usual where the duties of the office had actually been performed by the appointee, that at the same time, a Lieutenant of their regiment was made Lieutenant Colonel of the 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and his commission made to take effect on December 10, 1861, that if he and said individual should be thrown together in the service, his former Lieutenant would command him being his senior by commission, that others who never held commissions or saw service until January 8, 1862 would in like circumstances command him, that the officers of the 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry said their commissions from Governor William Dennison were like his, that they applied to Tod who gave them new commissions to take effect on December 10, 1861, that some 4 or 5 weeks since, Colonel Mason wrote to the Adjutant General of Ohio requesting that justice be done in his case and the cases of some others in the regiment, and that no response had reached any of them; requesting a new commission to take effect on December 10, 1861; and stating that he wished to add to the expression of his personal regard, the expression of his unqualified admiration of Tod's political course in the trying crisis of their national affairs.
4 pp. [Series 147-27: 183]

February 17, 1862
Fred[erick] C. Jones, Lieutenant Colonel, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Lebanon, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had received an order from General [Don Carlos] Buell to join the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry which he would do without delay, and that Colonel [Cyrus W.] Grant joined the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Crab Orchard some four days ago; thanking Buckingham and Governor William Dennison for their uniformly kind treatment; and stating that he would remember it with the most grateful feelings and be happy if his conduct should prove him worthy of it, that he left the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry with feelings of regret, having found many kind friends in it and having been almost uniformly treated with the greatest kindness, that he was happy to say that the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was in fine condition, that he was confident the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry would do itself and its officers honor whenever it was tried, that there were one or two officers in the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry who had been doing their utmost to create dissatisfaction and discontent ever since they came to Kentucky, that one of these persons, Captain S.R. Mott, was a candidate for the vacancy to be created by the resignation of Colonel Grant, that he knew Mott was not fit for the position, that in his capacity of instructor in the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry for a month or so past, he had occasion to nightly examine the officers of the companies in their duties, that he could say without reservation that Mott had less of the officer about him than any Captain in the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that there were a number of good company officers in the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but Mott was not of that number, that he believed it would be extremely detrimental to the service to appoint Mott to a field office, and that he felt a deep interest in the future welfare and usefulness of a body of men who had treated him personally with such kindness.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 121]

February 17, 1862
F[rederick] W. Lister, [31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry], Lebanon, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter acknowledging receipt of a communication from Buckingham in which he was assured of the safety of his position as Major and requested to return a commission as Lieutenant Colonel which had been forwarded to him on January 3; stating that having been on the march since the receipt of Buckingham's letter and the commission in question being in his camp chest, which he was compelled to leave behind, he would be unable to return it until the chest overtook him; acknowledging the kindness which prompted his promotion; stating that he trusted he would not be forgotten in the event of a vacancy which he feared might be the case, that the vexed question of Colonel [Cyrus W.] Grant's appointment had revived with all its bitterness, that Grant had come to report for duty and Lieutenant Colonel [Frederick C.] Jones was ordered for duty with the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he feared the effect of the transfer upon the regiment would be serious as Jones was much liked among the officers and beloved by the men, who admired Jones for his dashing, energetic, and soldierly qualities, that the infliction upon them of an utterly inefficient man of unpleasant manners and habits could not fail to impair the efficiency of an otherwise excellent regiment, that they had recently discovered a clue to the whole affair, that among the officers were two most turbulent and unruly men, Captain W[illiam] H. Free and Captain S[amuel] R. Mott, that when Jones joined the regiment, he endeavored to carry on his duty as pleasantly as possible, but found it necessary to inform Free and Mott that he was the Lieutenant Colonel and not them, that this was rendered necessary by the habit Free and Mott had of disputing orders, that finding they could not do as they pleased, Free and Mott commenced a correspondence with both Grant and [Samuel L.] Leffingwell, supposing that the restoration of Grant and Leffingwell to the regiment would enable them to continue in their un-officer like conduct, that the result was that Leffingwell had been mustered out of the service, but Grant was ordered to be examined by a board of officers, that he understood Mott aspired to a position in the regiment in the event of the removal of Grant, that Mott had, by his gross habits, rude manners, and vulgar language, rendered himself obnoxious to the large majority of the officers and men, that they presumed Mott would not be appointed to fill Grant's place, that Mott's utter disregard of rules and orders had subjected him to charges which were not brought on account of his age, that a recommendation for Mott's appointment to some regiment as field officer was, he believed, signed by some of the officers of the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but without the slightest idea of perpetrating such an infliction on themselves, that with regard to the question of Grant's fitness for his position, he wished to give a professional opinion, that during his term of duty at Camp Chase, it was his fate to encounter Grant frequently, that he did not remember hearing Grant give more than one order and that was so absurdly wrong as to excite the men, that in his administrative capacity, Grant was equally inefficient, that the cause of Colonel [Moses B.] Walker's objection to Grant was solely from the fear of his becoming a hindrance rather than an assistance to the efficiency of the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he believed an impression prevailed of personal feeling on the part of Walker towards Grant which was a mistake, that Walker had always expressed a friendly feeling towards Grant, only objecting to him as his second in command, that once more, even at the risk of boring Buckingham, he must mention the subject of his Camp Chase pay, that he was not a wealthy man and the expenses attendant upon his rank were not light, that a fresh question had arisen as to his pay as Major, and that Leffingwell had been paid up to the time of mustering out (January 20); asking if two Majors could be paid; and stating that if not, he would lose $750 for six months somewhat severe service in the U.S. Army.
3 pp. [Series 147-27: 156]

February 17, 1862
William Priestley, Caldwell, Noble County, Ohio. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter stating that as a member of the Military Committee of Noble County, he was frequently called upon by young men desiring the privilege of recruiting, that these young men wished to be recommended for appointment, etc., that not having heard from the Adjutant General's Department for some time, they were at a loss to know what advice to give these young men, and that they did not know whether the Adjutant General was appointing Lieutenants for recruiting at present; requesting that the Adjutant General advise them; stating that there was a young man (M.V. Barnes) who belonged to the 25th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he thought Barnes was a Private in Company B, that Barnes desired a permit to recruit and was of the opinion he could get up a company, that Barnes came well recommended, and that he thought Barnes could raise a considerable number of recruits; asking if the Adjutant General would consider giving Barnes an appointment; stating that he thought they could get up another company in Noble County if it was desired; and asking what was being done now in the way of recruiting, what the plans were, and if the Adjutant General desired more companies.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 8]

February 17, 1862
James F. Putnam, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he first became a member of Company B, 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and afterwards, by the consent of Captain [Henry K. McConnell], attached himself to the 8th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery where he was promised the position of Sergeant, that the day before they left for Camp Dennison, McConnell came to him saying that through the influence of Colonel [Barton S.] Kyle, he had secured him a position as Sergeant in one of the companies of the 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that McConnell said he spoke with Captain [Louis] Markgraff and that Markgraff would not give Putnam the position promised, that McConnell said he was only acting in Putnam's interest and that if Putnam chose to stay in the battery, he would not interfere, that the conversation with McConnell took place in the presence of witnesses, that he went with McConnell to Kyle, that Kyle said Buckingham had written respecting Putnam and was told that he had secured a position in the 8th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery and was well satisfied, that as he had no position in the battery, Kyle promised to see what could be done and let him know, that this was the last he heard from Kyle, that McConnell saw him as the 8th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery was leaving Camp Tod, that on February 16, he received a summons to return to Camp Tod on penalty of being treated as a deserter, that if he was a deserter now, he was when he left Camp Tod, and it would have been McConnell's duty to have him arrested at the time, that since arriving at Camp Dennison, he had received the appointment of forage master, that if McConnell was acting only for his interests, he could in no way add to them more than to let him remain at Camp Dennison, that he felt McConnell and Kyle had both acted very strangely, that he would like to have Buckingham's advice, and that the officers of the battery told him not to stir.
4 pp. [Series 147-27: 19]

February 17, 1862
M[oses] B. Walker, Colonel, 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Lebanon, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that should a vacancy occur by any manner or means in the office of Lieutenant Colonel of the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he hoped that Major [Frederick W.] Lister might be promoted, that if they were to look to the good of the service, he could not exaggerate the competency and efficiency of Lister, and that he would place Lister's nomination in due form in case a vacancy occurred.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 123]

February 17, 1862
Isaac N. Walter, 2nd Lieutenant, 47th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Gauley Mount, Virginia. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that on reporting himself, Colonel [Frederick] Poschner informed him that there was no vacancy in the 47th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and that he had not been told of the appointment until Walter's arrival, that he now reported to Buckingham for orders, that he did not like to be thrown out entirely as he had gone to considerable expense in equipping himself, that there were four vacancies in the 36th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry caused by resignations, that these vacancies consisted of three Captaincies and one 1st Lieutenancy, and that if Buckingham could give him one of those positions, it would be very acceptable.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 37]

February 18, 1862
V[alentine] Bausenwein, Colonel, 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Fort Donelson, [Tennessee]. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was the first regiment on the battery in advance of attack, that the flags presented by the ladies of Columbus were the first planted on the battery, that their band was the first playing the Star Spangled Banner, that they took upwards of 2,000 prisoners, 10 cannon, one 24-pound howitzer, and 1,000 boxes of ammunition, that they were 9 hours in the fire guarding their advanced battery, that they lost two men and had 9 wounded, among them 2 officers, that the rebels lost heavily in the regiment's front, that they found 9 rebels dead and dying within 100 yards of their column, that the rebels reported freely that the fire from the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was the most disastrous and proved too strong for them to secure all the dead and wounded, that consequently, the 9 rebels were left on the field, that they found hundreds piled in near the fort where they made their attack, that the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered to squat when the enemy made their charge and a little ravine made the protection, that the fire of the rebels was aimed too high and literally covered the men with brush and tree tops, that for this valuable aid and because the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry made the last decisive charge, the commander had allowed them four cannon, and that they needed an artillery company; requesting Buckingham to aid them in that purpose; stating that he desired to do good service, and was confident he had used his every energy to aid in the great victory, that there was much jealousy existing among military officers in the area, that he trusted the patriotic cause would not allow these gentlemen to do him injustice for he desired to remain in the U.S., that it was very probable when the war was over and American citizens again lived in peace and harmony and were connected in one general interest and united in one cause to sustain liberty, and if God willed, he would become a citizen of Columbus, Ohio, that he had made many valuable, dear, and kind friends who had aided him in the purpose for which he came to the U.S., which was to sustain liberty, that he would never forget his friends and he counted Buckingham as among the first of them all, that Lieutenant Colonel [Ferdinand F.] Rempel, the bearer, had been near his side during all the attacks, never flinching and ever ready to carry out his orders with promptness and dispatch, that through Rempel, Buckingham would receive some presents of "secesh" notoriety, that he had some 4,000 muskets, revolvers, etc., now under guard for the U.S. and thousands of tents, provisions of enormous bulk, sabres and every type of war implement, and hundreds of horses and mules, that their officers and soldiers walked no more and rode on "secesh" saddles and horses, and that Joseph Dister, a brother of Major [Peter] Dister, had been very active and energetic in behalf of the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for which service he desired him appointed to a commissioned office; requesting that Buckingham send him Mr. McDowel as his men were destitute; and stating that the men's families continually wrote that they were in need of money to buy the necessary provisions.
3 pp. [Series 147-27: 146]

February 18, 1862
James Cantwell, Colonel, 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Tod, Grafton, Virginia. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter requesting that a copy of the muster-in roll of the field and staff for the 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry be made out and forwarded to him; and stating that the copy reserved for the field and staff had been mislaid and could not be found, that they could not make out their rolls for pay without the pertinent roll, and that it might be possible that no third roll was enclosed with the two rolls sent to Buckingham's office.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 16]

February 18, 1862
Charles W. Fearns, Camp Beckett, Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that on February 10, he arrived in camp and reported to the Colonel, that he was ordered by the Colonel to take charge of men belonging to his brother and others, that he immediately reported himself to the office and also wrote to Buckingham requesting an extension of time, that he had still not received a reply, that his application for an extension of time was endorsed by Lieutenant Colonel Nolan as the Colonel was away, that he trusted it would be in Buckingham's power to extend his time, that otherwise, he would have nothing for his time and trouble in recruiting since December 27, 1861, that Colonel [S.J.] McGroarty had been told by Buckingham that the time would be extended, that he did not need to remind Buckingham that it required a written order to secure his position, that he did not need to apologize for requesting a written order because, as a military man, Buckingham knew its necessity, and that McGroarty had offered to get him the position of 1st Lieutenant, but unless his time was extended and he had a chance to get more men, he was left in a very uncertain position.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 10]

February 18, 1862
J[ames] A. Garfield, Colonel, 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, 18th Brigade, Camp Buell. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that a vacancy had occurred in the 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry by the resignation of David L. Scott, 1st Lieutenant, Company I; and recommending that 2nd Lieutenant Marion Knight of the same company be promoted to fill the vacancy, and that 1st Sergeant William L. Stewart of the same company be appointed 2nd Lieutenant.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 133]

February 18, 1862
George K. Hosford, Lieutenant, 53rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Hospital, Camp Diamond, Jackson, Jackson County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that his commission as 1st Lieutenant arrived the previous evening, but none for 2nd Lieutenant, and that he was appointed 2nd Lieutenant on October 9, 1861, and recruited 31 men which entitled him to a 2nd Lieutenant's commission; requesting that the commission be made out and forwarded to him at Portsmouth, Ohio; and stating that he would go there as soon as he was able to move and remain until he could take the field.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 7]

[February 18?, 1862]
S.J. McGroarty, Colonel, 50th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Beckett, near Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter reporting that the company of Captain Alonzo Miller was full; and stating that Miller joined his quota with those of W.H. Buck (appointed to assist Captain C.W. Dietrich) and John Davis (mustered in as a 2nd Lieutenant of the 50th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry), that at an election of the company, Alonzo Miller was nominated as Captain, W.H. Buck was nominated as 1st Lieutenant, and John Davis was nominated as 2nd Lieutenant, that Miller, Buck, and Davis were all sober men and had worked industriously for the regiment, that he took great pleasure in certifying to the moral and soldierly character of all three and testifying to the good service they had done the 50th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he was anxious to organize the regiment and hoped he might be excused for earnestly, but respectfully urging the appointments of Miller, Buck, and Davis at the earliest time, and that the eighty-third man on the roll was mustered in on February 5, 1862.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 95]

February 18, 1862
Minor Millikin, Colonel, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Headquarters, near Bardstown, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had written, while at home sick, recommending Madison Allen, son of their former Quartermaster, as a suitable person to succeed his father, that on returning to the regiment, he found that among other causes of dissatisfaction, the appointment of men outside the regiment to places in it was prominent, that he thought the officers of the 1st Battalion, having withdrawn their recommendation of Allen, now preferred the appointment of William McBurney who was next in order of promotion by reason of his present position as Quartermaster Sergeant, that he had examined McBurney as to his character and qualifications and believed him qualified for the post, that he was unwilling, under the circumstances, to insist on the appointment of Madison Allen (although he condemned the conduct of the officers in reference to him), and that as the case of the third applicant was not to be thought of, by reason of his serious illness, he hoped McBurney would be commissioned as soon as possible.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 22]

February 18, 1862
Opinions and recommendations of a military board assembled at Bardstown, Kentucky. Comments are included regarding Colonel Minor Milliken, and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas C.H. Smith, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Bears a note from O[liver] D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General, stating that the document was a true copy and for the information of the Governor of Ohio. Copied and forwarded by command of General [Don Carlos] Buell.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 67]

February 18, 1862
J[ohn] W. Sprague, Colonel, 63rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Tupper, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that in accordance with an order received from the Adjutant General, the 63rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry would embark that P.M. on board Steamers "Bostona" and "Pattin" for Paducah, Kentucky, that he desired to recommend Silas Thurlow for appointment as 1st Lieutenant in Captain C[harles] H. Titus' company instead of Louis Schmidt who had been recommended by Colonel Craig, that he was informed Thurlow had recruited over 60 of Titus' company, that Thurlow brought 10 recruits into camp last night and expected as many more that evening, that from what he had learned, he thought Thurlow deserved the appointment, that he had assured the men that they would soon receive their pay to December 31, 1861, and they started in fine spirits, and that he trusted good arms would be sent them at once.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 48]

February 18, 1862
L[orenzo] Thomas, Adjutant General, Headquarters of the Army, Adjutant General's Office, Washington. To the Governor of Ohio. Special Orders No. 36; stating that Captain George E. Lovejoy, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 1st Lieutenant Alonzo T. Prentiss, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant A.B. Charlton, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant Timothy Willcox, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant Samuel T. Storer, 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Captain W.H. Eckles, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Captain Samuel Pomeroy, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Captain W.W. Ogan, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Captain G.W. Kirk, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Captain J.W. McCabe, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 1st Lieutenant C.C. Adams, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant James Rutledge, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 2nd Lieutenant Josiah Jonson, 14th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, having been reported on adversely by boards of examination, and the President of the United States having approved the reports of the boards, were discharged from the service on the dates specified.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 11]

February 18, 1862
William H. Trimble, Colonel, 60th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (one year's service), Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter asking on what date the new system of recruiting took effect as against him, and where he was to find a U.S. mustering officer to muster the men recruited since that date; and stating that he telegraphed Lieutenant Colonel [Noah H.] Hixon to send him blank muster in and muster rolls for ten companies and had not received them, that he wished to organize the companies on the ground next Tuesday, make out the rolls, and be ready for mustering the last day of February and for the Paymaster on March 1, that any disappointment in not receiving the rolls would be a great disappointment to the full companies which had consented to be raised so as to perfect the organization within the time given him for that purpose by the Governor and Buckingham, that he wanted Major McDowel to have a clerk make a copy of the muster roll for Captain [Philip] Rothrock's company for the men to pattern by, that he wished these matters attended to, and that their camp was very muddy and they had no drill ground, but they were content and behaving themselves.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 96]

February 19, 1862
O. Bennet, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that the 63rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry left Marietta the previous evening for Kentucky, that he regretted being compelled to part with the regiment as he had labored early and late with them in the capacity of instructor from the commencement of the organization up to the time of leaving, that his only consolation was that his friends worked faithfully to get him a position in the regiment as he had labored harder for the good of the regiment than any other person connected with it, that he did not regret the time he spent with the regiment as the thanks received from officers and men would long be remembered, that he trusted Buckingham would not look upon him as an outside civilian when making appointments, that he had served the State of Ohio faithfully in a military capacity from April 19, 1861, and that had it not been for the position he was placed in, he would have been in three years' service now.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 177]

February 19, 1862
John Connell, Lieutenant, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Bowling Green, Warren County, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he received a commission on January 9, signed by Governor William Dennison, that he was assigned to the 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that when he arrived at Bowling Green, he witnessed a conspiracy to throw him out and not give him his place, that he had belonged to the 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry once before and resigned on account of disability, that when he got better, he received a dispensation from the Secretary of War to rejoin the regiment in case of a vacancy, which there was, that if Buckingham saw Dennison, he would give him a letter from John A. Bingham which would show this to be correct, that the plea of the Colonel [William S. Smith] and Surgeon [Samuel D. Turney] of the regiment was that he could not stand marching, that he traveled with the regiment from Green River to Bowling Green in 17 hours, and the regiment was in the advance of the brigade, that the only reason he could assign to the Colonel for not giving him his place was that he was not one of the Colonel's relations, that if the Colonel of the 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was a higher authority than the Governor of Ohio and Secretary of War, he would like to know where the Colonel got his authority from, that he helped to raise the regiment in the three months' service and three years' service, that he was with the regiment until October 1861, that he wanted to know whether he had any more right than outsiders, that he came to Kentucky to fight and to drive every secessionist from the State, that he wanted his position and did not want to be run out by unfair means, that he wanted justice done and for Buckingham to show the Colonels that the Adjutant General had some say, that they were all as well as could be expected and ready for a fight, and that they were ready to go on to Nashville.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 26]

[February 19?, 1862]
S.M. Donohoe, Minister of the Gospel and Member of the Ohio Conference of the M[ethodist] E[piscopal] Church, Iron Furnace, Scioto County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he believed it to be the policy of the government to act in good faith with soldiers, that he believed Captain J[oseph] L. Barber [6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry] had misrepresented the men of his company in order to force them into infantry, that W[illiam] H. Donohoe, his son and a Private in said company, after receiving an honorable discharge from the three months' service, enlisted in the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry for three years, that on or about January 12, he was present at Camp Dennison when Captain Dodd, by Buckingham's order, submitted to the members of Barber's company their choice to be transferred or disbanded, and every Private and noncommissioned officer voted against any transfer, and that they had not since changed their vote; and asking that his son be immediately discharged, if not needed for the service for which he volunteered, so that he might be at liberty to select another branch of the service.
3 pp. [Series 147-27: 163]

February 19, 1862
Alfred Eldridge, Quartermaster Sergeant, Headquarters, Ohio Volunteer Recruiting Service, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that there were at present one hundred and twenty-five troops stationed at the barracks, and that there were sixty-nine men in Company K, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and fifty-six recruits.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 53]

February 19, 1862
J[ames] A. Garfield, Colonel Commanding Brigade, 18th Brigade, Headquarters, Camp Buell, Catlettsburgh, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that Buckingham's communication of February 8, in reference to filling the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of 1st Lieutenant David Scott, Company I, 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was received, that he had written Buckingham a short time ago recommending that the place be filled by promoting Lieutenant [Marion] Knight of the same company and that 1st Sergeant [William L.] Stewart of the same company be made 2nd Lieutenant, that from Buckingham's communication, he saw it was the plan of the department to make promotion without regard to company organizations, that it would give much better satisfaction to all concerned in the regiment if vacancies could be filled from the companies in which they occurred, that there was now the most perfect harmony in the 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the companies were raised on the old plan and each was composed of men from the same locality, that there would be several other vacancies to be filled soon and he believed they could all be well filled from the companies in which they occurred, that another consideration was that the rank roll of the 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry as exhibited on the books in Buckingham's office was incorrect in several particulars, that the appointment of Captain [Frederick A.] Williams, Company A was dated September 20, 1861, that this was the date when he had a full company mustered in, that the appointment of Captain [Tully C.] Bushnell, Company C was dated August 10, 1861, whereas his company was not accepted and mustered in until September 24, 1861, that August 10, 1861 was probably the date of Bushnell's order to raise a company, that if that be taken as the basis of rank, injustice was done to Captain Williams who on either basis was the ranking Captain, but stood on Buckingham's books as sixth in rank, that there were several other similar inaccuracies in the rank roll as exhibited in Buckingham's late report, and that he trusted the appointment would be made as recommended in his former letter; and requesting a copy of Buckingham's late report. In the handwriting of W[illiam] H. Clapp, Acting Assistant Adjutant General.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 75]

February 19, 1862
Charles W. Hill, Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that in view of reports from Columbus and schemes on foot which had come to his knowledge, he was writing to avoid any misapprehension, that in saying he would accept the Colonelcy of the 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he interposed no condition whatever except that he should not be understood to waive his application for a brigade, that he had not been and was not now, by any act of his own, a competing candidate for the regiment, that his relations with many of the officers and men of the 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and with his neighbors in Toledo who were their relatives and friends, in view of the unfortunate condition of the regiment, forbid his refusing to accept the Colonelcy if the Governor saw fit to offer it, that the Governor knew his situation and wishes, that it was his understanding the Governor would not offer him the place unless he thought it his duty to accept it, that he regarded the proposition of the Governor and the request of the regiment as a call to duty which he must respond to affirmatively, and that let the consequences to him be what they may; and requesting that Buckingham lay his letter before the Governor.
2 pp. [Series 147-27: 176]

February 19, 1862
S. Meyer, Canton, Stark County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending Francis J. Meyer to Tod's favorable consideration; and stating that Francis J. Meyer was 1st Lieutenant of the 3rd Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery raised in Canton, Stark County, and vicinity, that from the commencement of the war, Francis J. Meyer had been one of the most prominent and unquestionable Union men and had probably done more for the good cause than any man in Stark County, that Francis J. Meyer, by indefatigable exertion, got up several companies in Stark County and neighboring counties, that it was owing to Francis J. Meyer's efforts that the 3rd Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery was raised, that Francis J. Meyer deserved the Captaincy of said company, and that he said this as a late political adversary and opponent of Francis J. Meyer.
3 pp. [Series 147-27: 163]

February 19, 1862
A.E. Strickle, Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that when he left Columbus on his way home from Camp Kelly, he expected to return to Columbus in a very few days to finish up his business, that he was prevented from doing so due to an attack of lung fever resulting from his exposure in the camps and hospitals of their troops in western Virginia, that he did not leave any account for his time on the last trip he made to Camp Kelly, etc., that if this was necessary before he was able to visit Columbus, he would have it made out and forwarded to Tod, that he had not left the house since his return, but thought he was now permanently better, that although he had only a limited personal acquaintance with Tod, he belonged to the same great family of Unionists who were engaged in the maintenance of the Government as it was unless constitutionally altered, that he felt free to express his sentiment on the subject of U.S. Senator, that he felt committed to former Governor William Dennison because of an appreciation of his ability and the friendly relations that had existed between them for many years, that he told his son-in-law (Mr. Bickham) that such was his position, but if Dennison was out of the way, he was in favor of Tod, that he thought it best to put off the election until next winter, as time would weaken [Benjamin F.] Wade and strengthen Tod or Dennison, that he was opposed to Wade on the grounds of "ultraism", that Dennison had informed him since returning from Washington, that he would not be a candidate, that if Tod desired the position, he would use his humble influence for the promotion of Tod's success by personally visiting his friends in the [Ohio] Legislature or writing to them as Tod thought best, that the matter was mentioned to Bickham for fear he might be inclined towards his neighbor, [William S.] Groesbeck, for whom, as a gentleman, he had a high regard, that he and Bickham agreed that it might be best, under existing circumstances, to make the selection from a person of Democratic antecedents, that he thought Senator [Benjamin F.] Coates and some others of the Democratic side would at least hear his reasons for the views he entertained on the subject, that Coates occupied a singular position as a politician at present, that Senator [Mills] Gardner and Representative [John Q.] Smith, although having voted for Tod for Governor, would be most likely to do what they could for others for U.S. Senator, and that he thought Gardner and Smith would support Tod as a compromise candidate.
3 pp. [Series 147-27: 150]

February 19, 1862
H[enry] E. Symmes, Captain, and Theo[dore] A. Startsman, Lieutenant, Company C, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Chase, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To ? Letter stating that Richard B. Wright was qualified and competent to discharge the duties of a commissioned officer in the infantry forces of Ohio and would reflect credit on the appointment if the Governor should see fit to issue a commission.
1 p. [Series 147-27: 74]

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