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SERIES 147. VOLUME 26. ADJUTANT GENERAL.
Correspondence to the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio
October 31, 1861-February 21, 1862.

October 31, 1861
C.E. Swearengen, Major, 3rd Virginia, et. al., Camp Keys, Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by eleven commissioned officers of General [Benjamin F.] Kelley's brigade; and stating that Captain Benjamin F. Hawkes would probably be an applicant for the position of Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to be made vacant by the resignation of [Herman G.] Depuy, that they wished to unite their testimony to Hawkes' efficiency as an officer and a gentleman, that their opportunities for making themselves acquainted with Hawkes had been of the most favorable character, that as the Assistant Adjutant General of Brigadier General [Benjamin F.] Kelley, Hawkes had rendered entire satisfaction to the officers of the brigade with whom he had business transactions, that in the field, particularly during the Battle of Romney, Hawkes had exhibited all the qualities of a gallant officer and brave man, and that under these circumstances, it was desirable on their part, if consistent with the Governor's views of public duty, to commission Hawkes as Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 198]

November 1, 1861
John S. Mason, Colonel, J[ames] H. Cantwell, Lieutenant Colonel, and James H. Godman, Major, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter recommending Captain Benjamin F. Hawkes of Ohio as a gentleman well qualified and in every way competent to command a regiment in the U.S. service; and stating that they had known Hawkes as the Assistant Adjutant General of General [Benjamin F.] Kelley, that Hawkes had filled said position to the entire satisfaction of Kelley and all others connected with their department of the army, that Hawkes had fought with them in the Battle of Romney on October 26, and distinguished himself by his gallant conduct on that occasion, that the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was now with them at Romney and they understood both the Colonelcy and Lieutenant Colonelcy of that regiment would be vacant in a short time by the resignation of the present incumbents, that if consistent with the Governor's views of public duty and the rules which governed his actions in such cases, they would be greatly pleased to have Hawkes appointed Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that they understood the officers and Privates of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry desired Hawkes' appointment.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 198]

November 2, 1861
B[enjamin] F. Kelley, Brigadier General, Camp Keys, Romney Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter enclosing copies of letters received from Colonel H[erman] G. Depuy and Lieutenant Colonel C[harles] A. Park of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry announcing their resignations; and stating that the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been exceedingly unfortunate in many respects, that its field officers had been separated from the regiment by sickness or some other cause during the entire summer and the regiment was sadly demoralized, that he could say with great frankness that he did not regret the opportunity the regiment had of being officered by more competent and efficient officers, that a large portion of the material of the regiment was good and, in the hands of laborious and competent field officers, would make a good regiment, that the regiment was with him in the late affair at Romney, that under Colonel Depuy and assisted by his Assistant Adjutant General, B[enjamin] F. Hawkes, the regiment displayed great steadiness and coolness under fire, that it was almost the unanimous desire of the officers of the regiment that Captain Hawkes be appointed Colonel, that while he would regret to lose the valuable services of Hawkes from his staff, he could not in justice to himself and to the service object to Hawkes' promotion and would be gratified by said promotion, that Hawkes had received a thorough military education at West Point, that Hawkes was a gentleman of good habits and address, industrious, and energetic, that Hawkes would be a credit to himself, to the Governor, and to his State if he received the appointment, and that in the late affair at Romney, Hawkes led the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and exhibited great coolness and gallantry.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 198]

November 3, 1861
John S. Mason, Colonel, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Keys, Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that he learned that Colonel [Herman G.] Depuy of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had tendered his resignation and that Captain B[enjamin] F. Hawkes, Adjutant General to General [Benjamin F.] Kelley, was an applicant for the position, that he felt it a duty and a pleasure to list Hawkes' qualifications, that Hawkes was in every way qualified for the position and was a good soldier, a strict disciplinarian, a high toned gentleman, and a man of undoubted courage, that in their attack on Romney, he had full opportunities to judge Hawkes' capabilities, that Hawkes was exposed to the heaviest fire, that Hawkes' coolness and personal daring in advancing at the head of their troops aided them and gave confidence and steadiness to the men, that the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was sadly in need of an efficient head, Colonel Depuy being in too feeble health to attend to the duties of his position, that he felt it a duty to urge an early action in making an appointment after the reception of the resignation of the present Colonel, that Depuy was a high toned gentleman and a good officer, but his health at present did not permit him to do such service as the regiment needed, that he offered his suggestions with the best interests of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and the service in mind, and that the 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry acquitted itself very handsomely in the late engagement and he could not ask for more willing, brave, or steady troops than they showed themselves to be.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 198]

December 22, 1861
Z. S[wift] Spaulding, Major, 27th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Sedalia, Missouri. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had the honor to be one of the first applicants for gubernatorial favors at Tod's hands and took the liberty of asking because of Tod's well known friendship with his father and the family, that the 27th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry went to Missouri in August 1861, in response to the call of General [John C.] Fremont, that the regiment had been organized less than forty-eight hours before leaving Ohio, that after two weeks encamped at St. Louis, they were ordered into the field where they remained to the present time, that their men had marched over six hundred and fifty miles, probably enduring greater hardships and privations than any other regiment sent out by Ohio, that it was not their object to complain of the past, that they took an honest pride in bearing their lot without a murmur, that a nobler or more uncomplaining set of men had never honored the State of Ohio, that it was in pride of Ohio that he reiterated the opinions of General [Samuel D.] Sturgis, General [James] Totten, General [John] Pope, etc., that they had one of the very best regiments in the United States Army, that it was in regard to their future that he begged to call Tod's attention and requested Tod's aid, that they were encamped in tents on the prairie about half a mile from Sedalia, that the ground was covered with snow to the depth of four or five inches, that they were the only Ohio regiment in the area, although he understood there were more Ohio troops of different arms of the service scattered over Missouri, that they were only brigaded when on special duty so no one felt any interest in them whatever, that much of their suffering was caused by having no one to plead their case, that they felt geographically out of their latitude, that while they were kept in Missouri, because of no one to claim their rights, Illinois and Iowa troops were sent to Kentucky (their regiment's proper field), that their men were able, willing, and even anxious to add to the glory of their native State by deeds worthy of themselves and felt they could never do this in Missouri, at least under any other than an Ohio brigadier, that they therefore asked either to be removed to the Department of Kentucky or that the Ohio troops now in Missouri be brigaded under an Ohio man, that in case of the latter, no man could suit them better, if he could be induced to accept the position, than Brigadier General J.H. Bates of Cincinnati, and that Bates had commanded at Camp Dennison and their interests would be safe in his hands; and requesting that Tod give their case early attention and thereby preserve the regiment from exposure and disease by which they had already lost over one third of the command.
3 pp. [Series 147-26: 124]

December 27, 1861
H[iram] A. Hall, Captain, Company E, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Hon. R.W. Taylor, Auditor of State. Letter introducing B[aylis] R. Fawcett, 1st Lieutenant, Company E, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry; and stating that it appeared Fawcett had received the appointment to the Captaincy of Company M, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and that an effort was underway by certain parties to effect a change in the appointment and to get [Julius L.] Hadley, Orderly Sergeant in the Warren company, appointed in Fawcett's stead, that Fawcett was the senior Lieutenant in the regiment and therefore entitled by rank to the appointment, that Fawcett was competent and had been in the three months' service, and that Fawcett probably did not have quite as many friends at "Court" as Hadley.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 66]

December 27, 1861
J.B. Holmes, 1st Lieutenant, Company M, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Judge Brinkerhoff. Letter introducing the bearer as the gentleman who had been promoted to the Captaincy of Company M, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry; stating that Lieutenant [Baylis R.] Fawcett was a man who seemed to be in every respect worthy of the position to which he had been promoted; and recommending Fawcett.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 67]

December 27, 1861
Thomas M. Vincent, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington. To George Arnold, Captain, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Letter stating that in reply to Arnold's letter of December 21, relating to the withdrawal of his resignation, he was directed to say that no official notice of the resignation and its acceptance were on file at the Adjutant General's office, and that Arnold's letter had been forwarded to the commanding officer of the Department of Western Virginia, Wheeling, Virginia.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 141]

January 7, 1862
J.A. Smith, 1st Lieutenant, et. al., 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Vance. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by twenty-one officers of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; asking that Lieutenant Colonel I[saac] N. Hathaway be assigned to another regiment; and stating that his appointment had created a spirit of dissatisfaction which could not be allayed, that Captain A[mericus] V. Rice of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was a suitable person for said position, and that they knew Rice to be well qualified and a man of military experience.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 120]

January 8, 1862
M[anning] F. Force, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp King, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that in the absence of Colonel [Charles] Whittlesey on an expedition down the river with four companies, he begged leave to call Tod's attention to two squads of men, that two companies of the 83rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been mustered out of the service, that many of these men wanted to form a company for the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that a squad had been recruited by Seneca Hale of Sidney, Ohio for the 83rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that this squad wished to be transferred to the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had suffered so much from companies being transferred from it, that no less than eleven companies had been taken from it and given to other regiments, as Tod could learn in detail from Mr. Taylor, Auditor of State, and from Judge Reuben Hitchcock, that it was only fair for some partial compensation to be made, that they should have been in the field in early October as General [Ormsby M.] Mitchel strongly desired, and that the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been so crippled that it was still incomplete; and requesting that orders be issued transferring Seneca Hale and his squad to Company I, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that the officers of the detached companies be authorized to recruit a company for the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 54]

January 10, 1862
Wesley Anderson, [78th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry]. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that in connection with the communication of the Colonel [Mortimer D. Leggett], it would perhaps be proper for him to add a few remarks in reference to his very unpleasant situation, that when he first entered upon the duties of his office, while in good health, he gave satisfaction even when his labor was more arduous than it had been since, that both Surgeons testified to this, that after he was fairly tried, he was promised a permanent appointment, that he had, however, been troubled by a lingering disease accompanied with that physical and mental depression common to disorders involving the digestive organs, that he was thus rendered incapable of discharging his duties satisfactory to all concerned, that the result was as stated by the Colonel, that he might or might not soon recover his energy, but he would remain in the county until he got an answer from his Colonel, that he would immediately return, if able, to his duty wherever he might be directed, that he asked and expected no more honorable situation than that of Private, but he prayed that it might be anywhere rather than in the 78th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that his preferences were the regiment specified by the Colonel, followed by Captain [Ephraim P.] Abbott's company in the 3rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and any company in the federal service outside of the 78th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that his enlistment drew many others into the service and for various reasons, he felt that he was entitled to a better situation, that all he asked was a transfer to more active service so he might banish his present exceedingly unpleasant feelings, and that he would then, notwithstanding his present and possibly permanent injury, serve his country cheerfully.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 18]

January 10, 1862
W[illiam] Gribben, et. al., House of Representatives, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by eleven members of the Ohio House of Representatives; and stating that from representations made to them, they were satisfied that I[saac] N. Hathaway, the present Lieutenant Colonel of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was not a military man and that his assignment to the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had caused much dissatisfaction and greatly retarded the recruiting service for that regiment, that Captain A[mericus] V. Rice of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was a man suitable for said position and in every way qualified, that Rice had done much toward recruiting the regiment while Hathaway had thrown every obstacle in the way, that Rice came from Putnam County, a county which had furnished nearly six hundred troops and as yet had not received the appointment of a field officer, and that they were further satisfied that the service would be greatly enhanced by the assignment of Hathaway to some other regiment and the appointment of Rice in his stead.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 121]

January 14, 1862
Edson Goit, Chairman, James A. Bope, and J.S. Patterson, Military Committee of Hancock County, Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that the assignment of Lieutenant Colonel I[saac] N. Hathaway to command in the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had not proved satisfactory to the men or beneficial to the service, that Hathaway was a civilian having no military qualifications, and that there were persons in the regiment of known military skill and fitness; suggesting the transfer of Hathaway to some other regiment; asking that Captain A[mericus] V. Rice be appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, believing that the regiment would fill much faster and be much better officered; and stating that Rice entered the service in April 1861, and had been a student of military tactics in theory and practice, and that Rice was a high toned gentleman worthy of the trust.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 122]

[January 14?, 1862]
W[illiam] Gribben, et. al. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by nineteen members of the Ohio House of Representatives, one member of the Ohio Senate, and a Lieutenant in the 6th Cavalry; and stating that having confidence in the integrity and patriotism of Captain A[mericus] V. Rice and also in his ability and experience as a military man, he having served as Captain in the three months' service and now being in the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, they requested the Governor to promote Rice to the office of Lieutenant Colonel.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 118]

January 14, 1862
E[rastus] B. Tyler, Colonel, 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Kelly, Patterson's Creek, Virginia. To Brigadier General William S. Rosecrans, Commanding Department of Western Virginia, Wheeling, Virginia. Letter stating that a rank roll sent from Columbus, Ohio notified him of the appointment of E[zra] H. Witter as 2nd Lieutenant on October 1, 1861, and assignment to Company D, 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that Witter had never reported himself for duty, and that to his certain knowledge, Witter had been guilty of habitual drunkenness and conduct unbecoming a gentleman since his appointment; and asking if they could be relieved of Witter upon their rolls and have a man of respectability appointed to the position. Bears notes of referral from W[illiam] S. Rosecrans to the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, and from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Washington to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 212]

January 14, 1862
M.C. Whiteley, A.J. Taylor, Major, 21st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), C.A. Croninger, and Ben Metcalf, Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that they were satisfied from expressions they had heard from members and officers of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and from their own observations that the service would be greatly enhanced by transferring Lieutenant Colonel I[saac] N. Hathaway to some other command and the appointment of some member of the 57th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to the position of Lieutenant Colonel; recommending Captain A[mericus] V. Rice as a suitable person for that position, knowing him to be a gentleman of good moral character and high military attainments; and stating that Rice's appointment would meet the unanimous approval of the regiment and ought to be made for the benefit of the service.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 119]

January 16, [1862]
S[amuel] H. Dunning, Colonel, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cumberland, Maryland. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter regarding vacancies, promotions, commissions, seniority among his officers, and the ranking of companies.
3 pp. [Series 147-26: 144]

January 17, 1862
Dwight Jarvis, Captain, and John Murphy, Lieutenant, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Jefferson, Kentucky. To ? Letter certifying that Franklin Blackburn, Company A, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who was about to apply for a commission as 2nd Lieutenant, was a young man of excellent character, had always performed his duty well while in the service of his country, and had the friendship and esteem of all his company officers and men of his company; and stating that Blackburn had been in the service about nine months and served his country well not only by performing all the duties of a soldier, but also in the several engagements that his company had taken part in, that Blackburn was always attentive and ready to perform his duties, cool yet decided, and never excited no matter how perilous his position might be, that Blackburn understood the several drills perfectly and was capable of filling the office, that they recommended Blackburn for promotion and hoped he might be commissioned, and that they felt certain Blackburn would make a good officer. Together with a letter dated January 22, 1862, from Anson Pease, Chairman, Military Committee for Western District, Stark County, Robert H. Folger, Western Military Committee, Stark County, and Henry Knobloch and William Bueher, Military Committee, West Side, Stark County, Ohio, Massillon, Stark County, Ohio, to the Governor of Ohio, stating that they had a long acquaintance with Franklin Blackburn and knowledge of his character and qualifications, that they concurred fully in the recommendation of Blackburn by Jarvis and Murphy, and that they united with them in recommending Blackburn for a 2nd Lieutenancy in the volunteer service.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 90]

January 17, 1862
W[illiam] S. Smith, Colonel, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Jefferson, Bacon Creek, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that 1st Lieutenant George H. Guild of Company K, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned his commission; requesting that the ranking 2nd Lieutenant of the 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry be promoted to fill the vacancy occasioned by said resignation and that Sergeant Cyrus S. Bates of Company B, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry be promoted to the 2nd Lieutenancy thus made vacant; and stating that Bates had performed his duties in a faithful and exemplary manner, that Bates had gone voluntarily into the most dangerous positions required by the nature of their service and had always acquitted himself creditably, and that Bates' promotion and those of Sergeants [William B.] Lambert and [Charles] Lindenberg (already recommended) would do much to create a laudable emulation throughout the rank and file of his regiment.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 89]

January 18, 1862
Jarvis S. Rogers, Acting Adjutant, 44th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Piatt, Virginia. To General L[orenzo] Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S.A., Washington, D.C. Letter reporting the present number of enlisted men in the 44th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry at 888, in compliance with General Orders No. 105, paragraph XIII. By order of Samuel A. Gilbert, Colonel, 44th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Bears a note dated February 1, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, referring the letter to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 117]

January 18, 1862
R.W. Taylor, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter handing the Governor letters dated December 27, 1861, from Captain Hiram A. Hall and Lieutenant J.B. Holmes regarding the appointment of Baylis R. Fawcett as Captain of Company M, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry; and stating that he presumed if the appointment of Fawcett as Captain was made as Hall stated, that no change had been since made.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 66]

January 20, 1862
George L. Hartsuff, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of Western Virginia, Wheeling, Virginia. To ? Extract from Special Orders No. 15, stating that Captain George Arnold, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had tendered the resignation of his commission, that the same was accepted to take effect on October 9, 1861, and that Arnold was honorably discharged from the service.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 163]

January 20, 1862
Jack [John W. Johnston], Syracuse, Missouri. To Dear Uncle [William Johnston]. Letter stating that his uncle probably never thought of him without recalling his "constitutional discontentedness" with every position in life he ever occupied, that given all the discomforts and degradation of the position of a Private soldier, it was surprising that he got on so well and was not utterly disgusted with it, that he believed if he had never been married and had only himself to provide for, he could go through life soldiering in the ranks as contentedly as doing anything else, that from his observation of the military profession, "the ranks" was the only place wherein a man could be content, that once a man was the incumbent of an office, whether it be 8th Corporal or Lieutenant General, he became the victim of envy, jealousy, ambition, and all other worrying passions to an extent utterly unknown in any other profession or pursuit in the world, that in spite of all this, he was fully convinced that his proper place was not in the ranks and that he ought to have a commission, that he was too old by 15 years to be in the ranks and was that much beyond the average age of the Privates now in service, that his greatest reason for wishing to be out of the ranks and to get a commission was that the pay of a Private was only 13 dollars a month (a very insufficient support for a family) while that of the lowest commissioned officer (2nd Lieutenant) was over 100 dollars a month, an income as large as he ever expected to get either in military or civil life, that when he enlisted for the war, he expected it to end about the time that he now thought it would fairly commence, that he also expected it would be a war of vigorous and active movements, of hard-fought battles, and of brilliant victories, that he now believed the war would continue to be, as it certainly thus far had been, exactly the reverse, that if all secessiondom was like Missouri, they could not put an army in the field which would be any credit for anybody to whip, that he supposed the chief reason for so much holding back on their side was that the leaders of their forces were afraid they might, by some mistake or accident, incur the burning disgrace of being whipped by such a set of "rapscallions", that his position in the army was a peculiar one, made peculiar by the fact that he was only a Private yet treated differently from all other Privates, that the whole labor of their soldiers there at present consisted in guarding the railroad and camp and providing wood and water for their own use, that he was not required to do these things and he was too good a soldier to do anything that he was not ordered to do, that for this immunity, he supposed he was indebted to the favor of Captain [William H.] Lathrop whose conduct towards him had been rather singular, that while Lathrop had been dreadfully austere and severe to all others under his command, he had been uniformly polite, gentle, and sometimes even deferential to him, that Lathrop had paid him liberally for services as clerk and procured him like employment from other officers, thus enabling him to earn more than a 1st Sergeant's pay, that Lathrop had expressed more than once a wish that he might become a Lieutenant, that in spite of all this, Lathrop had steadily overlooked him when filling the non-commissioned offices of his company, which were the usual stepping stones to higher rank, and advanced men who were not equal to him either in experience or capacity, that on the whole, he considered Lathrop's neglect in this respect overbalanced by the kindness he had mentioned and felt grateful to him accordingly, that Lathrop was a true gentleman, that vacancies which occurred in volunteer regiments were now filled simply by the appointment of the Governors of the several states on such recommendation as they choose to take, that the officers were appointed not for particular companies, but for the regiment, that several vacancies had occurred in Company G of the 39th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry since he had been in it, two or three of which were still open, that the unfortunate division of the 39th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry since it had been in the field had prevented him from making the acquaintance of Colonel [John] Groesbeck, that Major [Edward F.] Noyes was detached from them on General [John] Pope's staff, that if his uncle was on intimate terms with the present Governor of Ohio, he might have an opportunity to mention that he had a poor relation in the army who learned military tactics as quickly as ever learning anything, and that if his uncle sent him a patent rifle, he promised to try it on the first armed secessionist he saw.
4 pp. [Series 147-26: 86]

January 22, 1862
L[ionel] A. Sheldon, Lieutenant Colonel, 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Buell. To Colonel J[ames] A. Garfield, Commanding 18th Brigade. Letter reporting that Captain Horace H. Willard of Company F, 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was left sick in camp at George's Creek on December 31, 1861; stating that Willard immediately repaired to Louisa, Kentucky, that a few days thereafter and without leave, Willard went to his home in Portage County, Ohio where he now remained, and that Willard had never given any notice of his departure for home and remained away without notice or leave of the commanding officer of the 42nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry or other authority; and requesting that Willard be dealt with as the army regulations and articles of war required in such cases.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 100]

January 23, 1862
E[dward] Siber, Colonel, 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Clifton. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Copy of a letter stating that by the death of Captain Henry Goecke, Company B, who was killed in action on the Guyandotte on January 14, and by the resignations of 1st Lieutenant William Schulte, Company C and 2nd Lieutenant Christian Pfahl, Company A, accepted by General [William S.] Rosecrans on December 27, 1861, three vacancies had occurred in the corps of officers of the 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the present position of said regiment required these vacancies to be filled, that in consequence of this, he proposed, with knowledge of the field officers of the regiment, to promote 1st Lieutenant Charles Moritz of Company H to be Captain of Company B, 2nd Lieutenant John Hamm of Company G to be 1st Lieutenant of Company C, 2nd Lieutenant William Koenig of Company D to be 1st Lieutenant of Company H, Friedrich Ambrosius, Quartermaster Sergeant to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company A, Simon Hollandmoritz, Sergeant of Company B to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company D, and Gustav Wintzer, 1st Sergeant of Company C to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company G, that these last three noncommissioned officers had shown themselves as men of honor, ability, and bravery in the field, and that he most respectfully begged to make these appointments as soon as possible since the regiment was much in want of commissioned officers.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 70]

January 23, 1862
Noah L. Wilson, President, Office of the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad Company, Superintendent's Department, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter introducing A.B. Waters, the General Agent of the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad Company; and stating that he felt his company had hitherto failed in procuring its share of army transportation, that as he was desirous of having their legitimate portion hereafter, it was important for their agent to be personally known to Buckingham, that his company had lost all its through traffic in consequence of the unfortunate position of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, that his company was therefore dependent entirely upon local traffic for the means of keeping its wheels in motion, that as the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad's course was parallel with the Ohio River and was the nearest railway to over three hundred miles of river coast, he had supposed from a military point of view that it was important for it to be kept in operation, that the property was mainly owned in Europe and its leading proprietors had been urging him to stop the trains, close up the road, and wait for better days, that if this course was pursued, it would be difficult to put the railroad in operation again without much delay and expense owing to the dilapidated condition of its numerous wood structures which were now maintained by daily earnings, that the railway was now entirely safe, that it had an equipment equal to any business, but an increase of daily earnings was absolutely necessary to keep the road open for public use, that it was the most expensive public work in Ohio, having cost over $15,000,000, that it was projected mainly for through traffic, without which it could not be operated, that it was the only railway in Ohio which was entirely deprived of an eastern outlet by the war and was the only one in danger of stoppage as a consequence of the war, and that he thought high public interest demanded a special consideration for it.
3 pp. [Series 147-26: 114, 115, 116]

January 24, 1862
E.B. Fee, John Ferguson, D.C. Vance, and Jno. Johnston, Ohio House of Representatives, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that T.J. Louden of Brown County, Ohio, who was currently acting Quartermaster in the 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was an active and efficient young man of stern worth, and that Louden had served his country from the early part of the present war and was anxious to enter upon more active service; commending Louden as worthy of the station of Captain; and urging Louden's claims upon the Governor's consideration.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 103]

January 24, 1862
M[oses] B. Walker, Colonel, 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Somerset, Perry County, Ohio. To ? Letter stating that he was in command of Camp Dick Robinson, Kentucky for about six weeks, during which time Captain Elias Nigh was post Quartermaster, that he had much business and professional intercourse with Nigh, that Nigh possessed the rarest business qualifications, that Nigh had much business to do for the Government and found the officers of said post in a very loose and "deranged" condition, that Nigh very soon produced good order, that he had further opportunities of observing in Nigh qualities which he believed rendered him peculiarly fit for active command, and that he would be pleased to see Nigh's talents called into requisition in such manner as they might be most useful to the Government.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 227]

January 25, 1862
Samuel Beatty, Colonel, l9th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Green, Russell County, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending the promotions of Peter A. Laubie, 1st Lieutenant of Company D to Captain of Company H, Uriah W. Irwin, who was entitled to a 1st Lieutenancy from a recruiting order granted him, to 1st Lieutenant of Company H, Oscar O. Miller, 1st Lieutenant of Company C to Captain of Company I, Job D. Bell, 2nd Lieutenant of Company C to 1st Lieutenant of Company C, Homer J. Ball, 1st Sergeant of Company I to 2nd Lieutenant of Company C, Thomas J. Walton, 2nd Lieutenant of Company D to 1st Lieutenant of Company D, and Joseph S. Wilson, 1st Sergeant of Company D to 2nd Lieutenant of Company D; and stating that Tod would do him a favor by appointing the forgoing to the different positions named and sending their appointments and commissions to him as soon as convenient, that they were excellent men and would make the best officers for the positions named that he had in the regiment, and that the commission of Lieutenant Uriah W. Irwin should be dated November 1, 1861, and the others dated January 1, 1862, being the time they were severally joined to the respective duties assigned. Bears the endorsement of E[lliott] W. Hollingsworth, Lieutenant Colonel, 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
2 pp. [Series 147-26: 80]

[January 25, 1862]
Samuel Beatty, Colonel, 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the appointment of Oscar O. Miller, Lieutenant of Company C to the Captaincy of Company I was to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Captain [William] Rakestraw, and that [Peter A.] Laubie had been in command of Company H as Captain for some months, being detailed for that purpose.
1 p. [Series 147-26: 81]

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