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January 18, 1862
C.C. Marshall, and P[hiletus] W. Norris, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending Captain Israel D. Clark of Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio for the position of Major of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that they knew Clark to be a man of good moral character and believed him to be entirely competent.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 36]

[January 18?, 1862]
W[illiam] V. Neely, Lieutenant, Company H, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, et. al. To Governor David Tod. Letter signed by eight commissioned officers of the 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and recommending the promotion of Adjutant H[arry] G. Armstrong to be Major of said regiment to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Major William Gaskill.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 1041/2]

January 20, 1862
A[lfred] Ball, Surgeon, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Kelley, Patterson's Creek. To Dr. G. V[olney] Dorsey. Letter stating that a vacancy had occurred in their regiment due to the resignation of Major [William] Gaskill, that Adjutant Harry G. Armstrong would be an applicant for the place, that Armstrong was better qualified to fill the place than any other applicant, and that he wished Dorsey to use his influence with the Governor.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 101]

January 20, 1862
Thomas W. Gordon, M.D., et. al., Ripley, Brown County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by thirteen individuals; requesting the appointment of Alexander Jolly of Ripley as a Lieutenant in the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that Jolly was well qualified in every respect for said office, and that they knew Jolly well and felt assured that he would make a good officer.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 65]

January 20, 1862
J.J. Green, Waverly, Pike County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter enclosing Special Order No. 43, and two writs of habeas corpus; stating that Colonel [Peter] Kinney pretended to refuse the service of the writs on the grounds that the court had no jurisdiction; asking if the military authorities, especially a mere Colonel, were to arbitrarily determine the jurisdiction of the courts, if every court did not have the prerogative of determining its jurisdiction, and if this was not a constitutional right underlying liberty itself; stating that if the jurisdiction of courts was to be disposed of by the dictation of Colonels and disposed of without giving the parties a hearing, then the courts of Ohio were at the mercy of those men, that the Constitution and laws of Ohio gave the Court jurisdiction, that the Supreme Court had years since determined this very question, that if Kinney desired to test the jurisdiction of the court, he should do so by raising the question in the court and take his exceptions and error to the Supreme Court of Ohio, that this matter of jurisdiction was referred to Judge Plyly, Common Pleas Judge of the District, that he enclosed Plyly's letters with the parts underscored which he desired to call to Buckingham's attention, that Plyly sent the parties to the Probate Court and Kinney repudiated the writs of that court, that Plyly was now absent and Kinney was pursuing this course to defeat the service of a writ as the regiment would probably move soon, that these were the first writs of their kind sent to the regiment from the court and they would not have been issued had not the fraud and imposition been aggravated, that the applicants were poor men and by the conduct of Kinney, they had already been subjected to great inconvenience and expense, that all they desired was a fair trial by the laws of the State, that Pike County had nobly responded to the call of the country and it was a great injustice to her citizens for them to be denied the rights of a trial in the proper court, that he said proper court because he was able to establish that proposition, that Kinney well knew it as he would submit to have the question tried in a legal and proper manner, that the court in Pike County would delay its action until a return was procured from the Adjutant General's Department, that Kinney desired them to go to Scioto County for special reasons which would be but a mockery of justice to the affected parties, that their witnesses were in Pike County and it would be impossible to procure their attendance in Scioto County, and that this was well known; asking that the parties, having already been denied a trial in two cases, be discharged by the Adjutant General's Department or in case the Adjutant General decided that this was not equitable, that an order issue compelling obedience to the writs so that the questions of law arising in the cases might be tried and determined in the courts of the State; and stating that with confidence in the Adjutant General's Department, they submitted the whole matter, and that they hoped to receive as speedy a reply as the case would permit in order that the parties might resort to some other effective means if necessary and the courts be able to furnish any relief.
4 pp. [Series 147-25: 141]

January 20, 1862
R.P. Spalding, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter written on behalf of his friend, Captain John W. Sprague of Huron, Erie County, Ohio, who had recently returned from a grievous imprisonment at Richmond, etc., in the hands of the rebels; and stating that Sprague was among the first to volunteer when the tocsin of rebellion was sounded and their brave old flag was insulted, that Sprague was a patriot without any conditions, that Sprague was a man of intelligence and high moral character and every inch a soldier, that he urged that Sprague be made a Colonel of some good Ohio regiment as soon as a fit opportunity arose, and that he did this with confidence because he knew what the public service needed, and because he knew what pleasure it gave Tod to be the instrument of rewarding virtue and valor when discovered in civil or military servants. Together with a letter dated January 23, 1862, from William S. Pierson, Major, Hoffman's Battalion, to Governor David Tod; stating that Captain John W. Sprague resided ten miles from Sandusky, that he knew Sprague well and concurred in everything Spalding had said, that Sprague had a fondness for military life from his youth, and that he knew of no man from civil life who was as well qualified for the command of a regiment.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 27]

January 21, 1862
H.J. Dunahoe, President, City Council, Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Captain John W. Sprague of Erie County, who had just been exchanged and thus released from a long and painful incarceration in Charleston Jail, was a gentleman held in the highest esteem by the entire population of Sandusky and Erie County, that they believed Sprague to be eminently qualified as an officer to command a regiment, and that any consideration Sprague might receive at Tod's hand would be gratefully remembered by the community.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 27]

January 21, 1862
William Durbin, Banking Office of Barney, Hubbard & Durbin, Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter congratulating Tod on becoming Governor; and stating that he hoped Tod's administration might be successful in every way, that while he was not personally looking for the smallest crumb of patronage which might fall from Tod's table, he was exceedingly anxious to secure the advancement of some of their reliable friends, that prominent among these was his personal friend, Captain John W. Sprague of Erie County, who had just been released from five months captivity at Richmond and Charleston, that Sprague was in the 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that Sprague desired a higher and better appointment, that he earnestly invoked Tod, if any vacancy of Colonel or Lieutenant Colonel occurred, to bear Sprague's claims in mind, that Sprague was an active, energetic, highly intelligent gentleman and had large experience in military affairs, that in all the solid qualities of a gentleman, a patriot, and a soldier, Sprague was second to no man in their region of the State, that Sprague was no political soldier seeking place that he might reap emolument from the distresses of the government, that at the first call of the President for troops, Sprague left a large and remunerative business and promptly organized a company and took the field in response to that call, that if such a vacancy as he had indicated occurred, he hoped Tod might find it in his heart to advance Sprague, that he offered his unreserved guarantee that no better or more judicious appointment in every respect could be made, that these suggestions were made without concert or consultation with Sprague, but because he deemed them eminently just and proper, and that Sprague was a man of too much modesty and sterling merit to do justice to himself.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 35]

January 21, 1862
William H. Gibson, Colonel Commanding, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Wood, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that having advised the promotion of Lieutenant [Jonas] Foster to the Captaincy of Company E in the 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he was now requesting the appointment of Isaiah Bernard of the same company as 1st Lieutenant, that Bernard was a gentleman of intelligence and character, that Bernard would without doubt make a most efficient and valuable officer, and that in this case, the rule for the regular promotions could not be observed without manifest detriment to the service. Bears the endorsements of R[ichard] W. Johnson, Brigadier General Commanding, 6th Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Ohio, A[lexander] McD[owell] McCook, Brigadier General Commanding, 2nd Division, Army of the Ohio, and D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding, Department of the Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 95]

January 21, 1862
William H. Gibson, Colonel Commanding, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Wood, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that a vacancy in the Captaincy of Company E of the 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had occurred by the resignation of William Callihan; recommending Jonas Foster, 1st Lieutenant of the same company, for promotion to the Captaincy; and stating that Foster had shown himself to be an efficient and worthy officer. Bears the endorsements of R[ichard] W. Johnson, Brigadier General Commanding, 6th Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Ohio, A[lexander] McD[owell] McCook, Brigadier General Commanding, 2nd Division, Army of the Ohio, and D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding, Department of the Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 96]

January 21, 1862
Isaac Roberts, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that T.W. Moore of Ross County, Ohio, an almost life long acquaintance, was heretofore appointed Major of the 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that in consequence of the consolidation of the 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Colonel Craig's regiment at Marietta, there was a probability that Moore would be displaced and have to go into the ranks as a common soldier or retire from the service, that this would be regretted by himself and all others who were acquainted with Moore, that they knew Moore to be a good, reliable man and one who probably understood military tactics as well as anyone who had never been in an actual engagement, that he thought Moore would be the right man and in every way capable of filling the office of a commander of the regiment as Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, or Major, that he was certain Moore's appointment would meet the entire approbation of every person who was acquainted with his abilities as a military commander, that he hoped Moore's appointment as a regimental commander might meet with Tod's favorable consideration and that Moore might be retained as a commander of the consolidated regiment, and that the most prominent citizens of Chillicothe had heretofore sent a recommendation to Governor William Dennison which spoke highly of the ability of Moore, and this recommendation could be referred to by Tod.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 34]

January 22, 1862
E. Cooke, Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the numerous friends of Captain John W. Sprague, highly appreciating his character as a citizen and his talents as a military officer, were anxious for his promotion to the Colonelcy of a regiment, that he had known Sprague for many years as a private citizen and public officer, that Sprague was a gentleman who possessed a high grade of talents, great energy, and the strictest honor, that Sprague was eminently qualified for any military trust which might be conferred upon him, that he was anxious for the success of the holy cause in which they were struggling, that he had the fullest confidence in the peculiar fitness of Sprague for a high military position in the army, and that he would feel much gratified by Sprague's promotion to any trust within Tod's power to confer.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 28]

January 22, 1862
S[amuel] H. Dunning, Colonel, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Acting Brigadier General, 2nd Brigade, Lander's Division, Camp Kelly, Patterson's Creek. To Brigadier General L[orenzo] Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S.A. Letter informing Thomas that Major William Gaskill of the 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned his commission and that said resignation was accepted by Brigadier General [Frederick W.] Lander on January 19, 1862; recommending through Thomas to the Governor of Ohio, the appointment of Lieutenant and Adjutant H[arry] G. Armstrong of the 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Gaskill; and stating that Armstrong was at present on the staff of General [Frederick W.] Lander as Aide-de-Camp and was an able and competent officer, and that Armstrong's promotion would give general satisfaction to the regiment. Bears a note dated February 8, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, referring the letter to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 180]

January 22, 1862
E.W.H. Read, Captain, 8th U.S. Infantry, Depot of Prisoners of War, near Sandusky, Ohio. To Sir. Letter recommending Lieutenant A.G. Luther of the 1st Company, Hoffman's Battalion for a position in the regular army of the United States; and stating that Luther had already been in service, having served in one of the Ohio regiments at [First] Bull Run, that after the three months' men were discharged, the Governor of Ohio appointed Luther a 1st Lieutenant in one of the companies now on duty as the guard at the depot [Johnson's Island], and that he was happy to be able to bear testimony to the zeal and fidelity with which Luther performed his duties as an officer.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 66]

January 22, 1862
Charles C. Walcutt, Lieutenant Colonel, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Lyon, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter introducing his friend, Captain [Alonzo G.] Sharp of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that Sharp had rendered valuable service to the regiment, having labored incessantly since August 1861 under the most trying circumstances for the completion and final organization of same, that Sharp was laboring at a time when, after many weeks had rolled by, they had but fifteen or twenty men and prospects were very dark for getting more, that still Sharp worked, knowing no such thing as failure, that now Sharp had the satisfaction of seeing the regiment full, that Sharp had not only filled his own company, but had assisted in the organization of two others, that Sharp was a fine businessman, an indefatigable worker, and had attained quite a knowledge of military affairs, having had experience in the three months' service, and that since there was a vacancy in the field staff of the regiment, he recommended Sharp for consideration.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 41]

January 22, 1862
Enoch Weller, Captain, Company B, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Thomas C. Fernald, Captain, Company G, 72nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that many of the fellow citizens of Captain J[ohn] W. Sprague of Erie County (who had lately returned from the South, having been, while acting as an officer in the Federal army, taken prisoner and confined for many months in the prisons of Richmond, Charleston, and Columbia) desired to see him placed in a position equal to his merits and such as would enable him to strike many and hard blows for the good cause of the Union, that deeming Sprague amply capable to discharge its duties with great credit to himself and to the special advantage of his country, the post of Colonel was desired for him by his many friends, and that appreciating the superior capacity of Sprague as a man and his fitness for the office named, and also Sprague's great anxiety for an opportunity to meet the enemies of his country in a fair fight, they would ask that the position named be given to him at the earliest possible day.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 29]

January 22, 1862
T[homas] Worthington, Colonel, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Ohio Militia, Adjutant General's Office, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending Captain William Smith of Van Wert County as well fitted for the appointment of a field officer of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that Smith served in the Mexican War, was an intelligent and active officer, and was entirely acceptable to a great majority of the regiment.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 37]

January 23, 1862
W[illiam] B. Chapman, 1st Lieutenant Commanding, 2nd Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, Headquarters, Camp Halleck, near Rolla, Missouri. To Brigadier General [Alexander S.] Asboth, Commanding 4th Division. Letter stating that Augustus Beach, Orderly Sergeant of the battery, was a good and valiant soldier, and a gentleman and scholar, that Beach had rendered much valuable service to the country as a member of the battery, and that he recommended and asked that Beach be promoted to a 2nd Lieutenancy. Bears endorsements of Brigadier General [Alexander S.] Asboth, and Brigadier General Samuel R. Curtis; and a note from N[athaniel] H. McLean, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Missouri, St. Louis, referring the letter to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 131]

January 23, 1862
M[anning] F. Force, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, City Barracks, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that on January 21, while at home on furlough, Private George Emel of Company F, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was arrested and taken into the camp of the 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry by Captain John Woodward, that Emel was long since mustered into the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and had been mustered into no other regiment or detachment, that Emel's name was on file in Buckingham's office and in the office of the Adjutant General at Washington as a Private in Company F, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that Emel had drawn clothing, subsistence, and pay in that company and nowhere else, that Woodward claimed that Emel was entered on his enlistment roll before being mustered into Captain [William W.] Updegraff's company, that he understood that Woodward did not claim that Emel was mustered or sworn, or that Emel drew pay or subsistence, or that Emel served, that the last and only company in which Emel served was Updegraff's company, and that Woodward had laid himself open to the penalties named in Article 22 of the Articles of War; and asking for an order upon the officer commanding the 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry requiring him to release Emel. Bears a note from Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham referring the letter to Rodney Mason, Colonel, 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Also bears a note from Rodney Mason, Colonel, 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, stating that George Emmel was enlisted, sworn, and mustered into the 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry on October 9, 1861, by Woodward, then a 2nd Lieutenant duly authorized to muster, that Emmel was afterwards, with full knowledge, received into Updegraff's company, and that Emmel was arrested as a deserter from the regiment by his orders and was now in camp.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 177]

January 23, 1862
Oliver D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Extract from Special Orders No. 19; stating that the resignation of Surgeon D[aniel] E. Wade, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was accepted to take effect on January 23, 1862. By command of Brigadier General [Don Carlos] Buell.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 21]

January 23, 1862
Elijah Hayden, Camp Kelley, Virginia. To H[arrison] G. Blake. Letter stating that he was thankful Blake was his friend and hoped that he might prove worthy of his confidence, that he would prefer to stay in Captain [Ora O.] Kelsea's company [Company H, 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry] if there was any chance of his promotion there, that if there was not, he desired to get somewhere else, that he did not think he was any more worthy of a commission than many others, but he was a poor man, that it was of great importance to his family that he secure a better position, that he was enclosing a recommendation from Kelsea, that Kelsea was one of his warmest friends and he hoped to merit his confidence, that if Blake presented his recommendation together with the one from Kelsea to the Governor, he was confident of securing a position somewhere in the volunteer service, that he understood the Colonel had spoken highly of him as a drill master since joining the regiment, that the Colonel was well qualified to judge, being a thoroughly educated military man, and that the Colonel was putting things right in the regiment.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 52]

January 23, 1862
J.W. Henry, et. al., Ripley, Brown County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter signed by twenty-one citizens of Ripley and vicinity; requesting that Tod recommend Colonel J[acob] Ammen of the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, now in Kentucky, to the President and Secretary of War for the position of Brigadier General; and stating that said appointment would give great satisfaction to the people of southern Ohio, that Ammen was known to be eminently qualified because of his military education and long service in the army, and that Ammen was an energetic, wise, and prudent man.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 64]

January 23, 1862
D.W.D. Marsh, New Lexington, Perry County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter handing Tod a recommendation for his appointment to some place in the army; and stating that he did not make the application with any great hope of success, knowing as he did that there were so many seeking the same object, that he did think, however, that Perry County was entitled to some credit for the manner in which her men had turned out in the volunteer service, and that, in the distribution of the officers (where all were equally qualified), Perry County should be remembered, that he once had the pleasure of hearing Tod make a political speech relating the anecdote of a man about to die, that the man had sent for Tod to write his will and directed him to insert a clause in it that the will should not take effect until his death, that Tod informed the man that it would be of no account as the will would not take effect until death as a matter of course, that the man replied "never mind, put it in, it will do no harm", that this reminded him of his situation, and that he made his application without much hope of success, but believed it would do no harm.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 4]

January 23, 1862
E[dward] Siber, Colonel, 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Commanding Post, Headquarters, Camp Clifton. To L[orenzo] Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S.A. Letter stating that by the death of Captain Henry Goecke, Company B, who was killed in action on the Guyandotte on January 14, 1862, and by the resignations of 1st Lieutenant William Schulte, Company C, and of 2nd Lieutenant Christian Pfahl, Company A, which were accepted by General [William S.] Rosecrans on December 27, 1861, three vacancies had occurred in the corps of officers of the 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry which the present position of said regiment required to fill up immediately, that in consequence of this, he hereby proposed, with the knowledge of the field officers of the regiment, to promote 1st Lieutenant Charles Moritz of Company H to be Captain of Company B, 2nd Lieutenant John Hamm of Company G to be 1st Lieutenant of Company C, 2nd Lieutenant William Koenig of Company D to be 1st Lieutenant of Company H, Quartermaster Sergeant Frederick Ambrosius to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company A, Sergeant Simon Hollandmoritz of Company B to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company D, and 1st Sergeant Gustav Wintzer of Company C to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company G, that the last three mentioned noncommissioned officers had shown themselves as men of honor, ability, and bravery in the field, and that he begged to make these appointments as soon as possible since the regiment was very much in need of commissioned officers. Bears a note dated February 5, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, referring the letter to the Governor of Ohio.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 69]

January 23, 1862
E[dward] Siber, Colonel, 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Commanding Post, Headquarters, Camp Clifton. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that by the death of Captain Henry Goecke, Company B, who was killed in action on the Guyandotte on January 14, 1862, and by the resignations of 1st Lieutenant William Schulte, Company C, and 2nd Lieutenant Christian Pfahl, Company A, which had been accepted by General [William S.] Rosecrans on December 27, 1861, three vacancies had occurred in the corps of officers of the 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry which the present position of said regiment required to fill up immediately, that in consequence of this, he proposed, with the knowledge of the field officers of the regiment, to promote 1st Lieutenant Charles Moritz of Company H to be Captain of Company B, 2nd Lieutenant John Hamm of Company G to be 1st Lieutenant of Company C, 2nd Lieutenant William Koenig of Company D to be 1st Lieutenant of Company H, Frederick Ambrosius, Quartermaster Sergeant to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company A, Simon Hollandmoritz, Sergeant of Company B to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company D, and Gustav Wintzer, 1st Sergeant of Company C to be 2nd Lieutenant of Company G, that the last three mentioned noncommissioned officers had shown themselves as men of honor, ability, and bravery in the field, and that he begged to make these appointments as soon as possible since the regiment was much in want of commissioned officers.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 77]

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