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January 22, 1862
David W. Houghton, Elyria, Lorain County, Ohio. To the Honorable James Monroe. Letter enclosing the order under which he enlisted 80 men while a Lieutenant in the three months' service; and stating that the Adjutant General did not accept these men at the time owing to not having pieces to arm them with, that he kept these men together and then joined Captain [Warren P.] Edgerton's battery, taking 66 men with him which the muster roll of the company would show, that some friends of his in Washington, D.C. told him that in order to be discharged or mustered out he had to be assigned to some company, that he was duly mustered into the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery and when he went to Columbus and got the company accepted, Edgerton was away in Boston, that the Adjutant General knew full well that he had command of the company during Edgerton's absence, that when he went to Columbus and tendered his resignation, it was because the Adjutant General and Paymaster told him that he must resign in order to get his pay, that he did so and was now in a fix, that it seemed he could be assigned to some company long enough for him to get his pay and then leave the service if necessary, that he was just as anxious to remain in service as he was the first time he enlisted, that he was first on the roll in the three months' service, then re-enlisted, and had been in service ever since, that he had lost his time and all of his pay for that service, and it seemed as though something ought to be done in his case, that competent legal authority said that if the United States would not pay him, the State of Ohio must, that he wanted it understood that the only reason he tendered his resignation was to get his pay, that he wanted Monroe to have the Adjutant General send him a leave of absence or at least ask whose orders he was under, that as it was now, he could not do anything to make a living, that he was completely broke, that his wife and family were sick and he did not know which way to turn his hand for anything, that he did not want to trouble Monroe, but hunger and necessity compelled him to, that if he did not get his pay or at least some signs of it, he would have to sell his house and lot to meet obligations which he had contracted on account of this matter, and that it would break him up entirely.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 72]

January 22, 1862
Thomas M. Hunter, Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had made an application to the Honorable E[dwin] M. Stanton for a commission in the United States Army as a Lieutenant, that his object in writing was to obtain a letter from Tod to Stanton in his favor, that he made a similar application to the former Secretary of War, but without success, and that he believed a commission would be issued to him if Tod would request it.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 39]

January 22, 1862
Lyman J. Jackson, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that having received an appointment as Major of the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he wished to make suggestions as to his successor in the Captaincy of Company G, 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he believed there were special reasons why the vacancy should be filled by regular promotion in the company, that Henry C. Greiner, now 1st Lieutenant, would make a most excellent Captain, that Greiner was a man of fine business capacities, good education, very exemplary character, and was a successful disciplinarian, that Greiner's knowledge of military tactics was probably equal to any Lieutenant's in the regiment and was most unquestionably superior to that of the ranking Lieutenants of the regiment, that leaving Greiner's present position out of the question altogether, he did not think a better appointment could be made, that 2nd Lieutenant James W. Martin was an energetic officer and would make a good 1st Lieutenant, that Orderly Sergeant Joseph W. Lidey understood the military tactics better than any non-commissioned officer he ever met in the volunteer service, that Lidey also had the other necessary attributes of an officer in full, namely integrity, intelligence, and industry, that Lidey had served under his command since April 27, 1861 (excepting a few days' interval after the close of the three months' campaign) and he had ample opportunity to know him, that he cordially recommended that Lidey be appointed 2nd Lieutenant, and that the appointments suggested would be agreeable to the company and he thought would be recommended by Colonel [Moses B.] Walker unless some rule interfered.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 97]

January 22, 1862
J.C. Kelton, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. To the Governor of Ohio. Extract from Special Orders No. 66, stating that Private Joseph Dister of the 22nd Regiment, Illinois Volunteers was discharged with the view of his accepting a commission from the Governor of Ohio. By order of Major General [Henry] Halleck.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 46]

January 22, 1862
H[oward] S. Lovejoy, Captain, Company D, 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Wellington, Lorain County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter introducing Sergeant G[eorge] W. Hicks of the 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; stating that Hicks was now on detached service; presenting Hicks' name for the position of 2nd Lieutenant in the 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry or some other regiment in active service; and stating that Hicks was well drilled and would make a good and reliable officer.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 183]

January 22, 1862
Louis Markgraf, 1st Lieutenant, 8th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, Camp Dave Tod, Troy, Miami County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that for the resigned assistant, Joseph Barnett from Dayton, he took Adolphus Schmidt from Butler County, Ohio, that Schmidt was well qualified to be an officer in the battery, and that Schmidt was a man who could be recommended in every respect; and requesting the necessary papers for Schmidt.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 89]

January 22, 1862
Granville Moody, Colonel, 74th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Lowe, Xenia, Greene County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter recommending William W. Bowman as a proper person to be appointed 2nd Lieutenant for recruiting purposes in behalf of the 74th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and requesting that Bowman be given an unrestricted commission, if possible, as he wished to visit several localities and raise his company within two weeks, that Bowman's commission be forwarded to Cincinnati, and that if Bowman could not be given an unrestricted commission, that one be given for southern Ohio.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 22]

[January 22?, 1862]
M.P. Nolan, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 50th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Beckett, near Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter recommending John C. Edmondson of Urbana as a proper person to commission as a Lieutenant to recruit for the 50th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Bears the endorsement of the War Committee of Champaign County and others.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 26]

January 22, 1862
T[heopilus] Paessler, et. al., Company I, 30th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Union, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter signed by sixty-six members of Company I, 30th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; stating that they had learned that Captain [George H.] Hildt had been promoted to Major and deemed it in their interest to have good officers over them, that it was reported that James Morrow had been promoted to the 2nd Lieutenancy of Company I, that they brought the charges of incompetency and drunkenness against Morrow, that their Orderly Sergeant was a man fit to discharge the duties and ought to be appointed as he served in the three months' service and re-enlisted in the three years' service, that they knew Morrow would be represented as capable for the office by his friends, that if Tod doubted the qualities of [Stephen B.] Wilson, they would refer him to Levi Sargent, member of the Board of Public Works, that Company I consisted of 88 members, 16 of whom were absent, that the absent men would feel the same way as the signers and unhesitatingly subscribe their names if present, and that they therefore stood as 82 against 6.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 105]

January 22, 1862
R.P. Ranney, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the bearer, General Willson, an estimable citizen of Cuyahoga County, had a son in the army in Kentucky who was sick, that Willson felt compelled to visit his son to see that he was comfortably cared for, that he had advised Willson to call upon Tod for the purpose of getting such papers as might be necessary to accomplish his object, and that he had assured Willson that Tod would do anything necessary to meet his wishes.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 25]

January 22, 1862
George C. Reis, Falcon Iron Works, James Ward & Co., Niles, Trumbull County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter enclosing a recommendation of the Trumbull County Military Committee in favor of the appointment of William Ward, Jr. as 2nd Lieutenant; and stating that William Ward, Jr. was a son of his partner and had been recruiting for Captain Parsons' battery of Parrot guns to be connected with the 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that William Ward, Jr. had been sworn in and had recruited quite a number of men who had been sent forward to Romney, [Virginia], that William Ward, Jr. was still getting more men and was very active, that he hoped Tod would favorably consider William Ward, Jr.'s application, and that William Ward, Jr. expected to start himself for Romney about February 1.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 17]

January 22, 1862
Ferd[inand] F. Rempel, Lieutenant Colonel, 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Acting Post Commander, Headquarters, Camp Chase, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that upon examination of the guard house prison, he found two Privates named D[avid] Unum and E. Regel, both of Company E, 40th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, confined there for desertion since December 23, 1861, that they were in bad condition as to cleanliness, that he had them well cleaned and new clothing put on them, and the beds and bedding in the house thoroughly cleansed, and that he was informed that they had two deserters from the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the 40th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; asking if it would not be best to forward, under guard, the two prisoners to the 40th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and claim in return the two deserters belonging to the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that these deserters were named Curtis Cummins and John Bolton, that he would await Buckingham's orders on the subject, that it appeared to him that the detention of the guard house prisoners was pure neglect of proper authority, that the errors in the certificates of release of prisoners occurred through General [Valentine] Bausenwein's secretary, that his command was nominal and he trusted the secretary to properly get up the certificates, and that he would be more particular hereafter until Bausenwein's return.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 1]

January 22, 1862
George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D.C. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter reporting that 2nd Lieutenant Moses B. Gist, 30th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned effective December 20, 1861. Bears a pencilled note stating that Gist was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on November 19, 1861.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 42]

January 22, 1862
C.H. Sargent, Colonel, 52nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Ohio Militia, Adjutant General's Office, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter requesting that Joseph J. Ennis, Henry C. Haker, and John N. Fallis be granted authority to recruit for the 52nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 21]

[January 22, 1862]
C.H. Sargent, Colonel, 52nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. To ? Letter stating that recruiting commissions were wanted for George A. Foster, Josiah Anderson, F.A. Taylor, William Meier, Charles Stewart, Samuel B. Westenhaver, Henry Kruse, and Volters, and that all were for the 52nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 21]

January 22, 1862
W[illiam] S. Smith, Colonel, J[oseph] G. Hawkins, Lieutenant Colonel, and Benjamin P. Runkle, Major, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Jefferson, Bacon Creek, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending William B. Lambert, Orderly Sergeant of Company C, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry for a commission as 2nd Lieutenant; and stating that they did this believing Lambert to be fully competent in every respect to fill the office, and that Lambert's promotion would be no more than a just reward for valuable services rendered in western Virginia. Bears the endorsement of A. Waddle.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 112]

January 22, 1862
William E. Stevens, Captain, 77th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter asking, since he had the oldest Captain's commission, if he was entitled to the letter A in the regiment; stating that under Article 12, Section 17 of the revised army regulations, his Colonel refused to award him that letter, that it was said he had the best disciplined and drilled company in the regiment, that he was asking for nothing except what was his right, and that he was almost a stranger to the laws of their great republic, an alien in a strange land; asking Buckingham what his place ought to be in the regiment; and stating that as his company was now lettered, his commission ranked third.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 66]

January 23, 1862
Dudley Baldwin, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter mentioning the name of Captain Trueman Seymour of the 5th Regiment, U.S. Army in connection with the Colonelcy now vacant in an Ohio regiment; and stating that he had seen very little of Seymour himself, but from what he had seen and from what he had heard, he believed Tod would hardly get a better Colonel, that Seymour was in all the battles on the line from Vera Cruz to Mexico, being then just out of West Point, that Seymour was also at Ft. Sumter, and that if he had the appointment to make, he would want to inquire further regarding Seymour's qualifications.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 111]

January 23, 1862
P[atrick] H. Breslin, Captain, 18th U.S. Infantry, and Mustering and Disbursing Officer, U.S. Army, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that Charles Loomis, a Corporal in Company A, 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, presented papers and vouchers to him that morning, that on October 21, 1861, Loomis received from R[odney] Mason, Assistant Adjutant General of Ohio, an appointment as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 43rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry conditional on recruiting a certain number of men within a given time, that Loomis wished to ascertain his present position as a soldier or officer in the service of the United States, that he considered Loomis' discharge from the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to be entirely irregular, that Loomis was discharged for no cause save that of special orders dated September 27, 1861, from R[odney] Mason, Assistant Adjutant General of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio, that had Loomis received a full commission or appointment to a Lieutenancy, he should not have been summarily disposed of, but simply entered on the muster rolls of the company as promoted, that if Loomis had been transferred, the consummation should have been in accordance with the regulations, that Loomis was not considered to be an officer since he represented that the appointment personally applied for was refused for some unknown reason, that because of insufficient cause and by reason of irregularity in his discharge papers, Loomis was and must be considered a soldier of the United States volunteer forces for and during the term of enlistment in his original capacity at the time of receiving said discharge, that he had always heard Buckingham spoken of as a man of excellent heart and just in all things, that he respectfully begged leave to intercede for Loomis, that Loomis' officers undoubtedly considered him as having received the promotion in question, that he had known Loomis personally for many years, that Loomis was well educated and respectably connected, that Loomis entered the ranks as a Private and as proof of capacity, rose step by step to be Orderly Sergeant of his company, that Loomis was filling said position at the time of leaving the regiment and company, that if Buckingham personally knew the class of men who by intrigue and money had forced themselves into appointments and commissions as well as he had and did, Buckingham would select Loomis in preference to six-tenths of them as being best qualified in every sense to take precedence for the honor of a commission, that he hoped Buckingham would take into favorable consideration Loomis' request for an appointment as Lieutenant in one of the regiments now filling up, and that as drill master in a new regiment, Loomis' services would be invaluable.
3 pp. [Series 147-24: 52]

January 23, 1862
R.T. Brown, Indianapolis, Indiana. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had made an application through some of his friends locally for a Captain's commission in the regular army, that some of their best men locally, including James M. Ray, president of their State bank, Governor [Oliver P.] Morton, and Mayor Maxwell, had given him letters, and that he had sent these letters to Mr. Porter, Member of Congress from his district; requesting that Buckingham write a letter of recommendation to Secretary of War [Edwin] Stanton, not regarding his qualifications for he had sent proof enough of that, but as to who and what he was; and stating that Buckingham had known him since childhood and also knew his family, that what was done must be done immediately as the letters already sent were now in Stanton's hands, that as far as qualifications were concerned, he had made it a study for the last four years to perfect himself in military tactics, that he was not vain in saying he was considered one of the best drilled men in Indianapolis and could at any time get a Captain's commission in volunteer service, that he wanted to get in the regular army, after which he would show Buckingham a good account, that he had always tried to live honorably, that his father died when he was a child and since then he had done for himself, that he had been among all kinds of people, that no one could accuse him of ever at any time indulging in drinking or any vices young men were prone to, and that he had always tried to live to honor his mother and father.
3 pp. [Series 147-24: 43]

January 23, 1862
C.C. Carlton, Banking and General Insurance Agency, Office No. 197, Superior St., Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he met Captain David A. Russell of the U.S. Army in New York in November 1861, that Russell had just returned with his regiment from California, that as his son was in the same regiment, he saw Russell frequently, that from that short acquaintance, he was very favorably impressed by Russell as an officer and gentleman, that his son also spoke of Russell in the highest terms as a military man, and that he believed Russell enjoyed the full confidence of the officers and the entire regiment to which he belonged.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 118]

January 23, 1862
John H. Carter, Lieutenant Colonel, 52nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he understood that Lieutenant Frank McGrew's commission had been revoked, that from McGrew's representation, he had recruited about twenty-one men at his own expense, that McGrew was now very desirous to have his men consolidated with Captain D.B. Carter's company, that putting these men into Captain Carter's company would make this company up to the maximum, and that from what he could learn, there was an underhanded movement being made to place these men into a company which had never used any effort to recruit.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 69]

January 23, 1862
W[illiam] A. Choate, Captain, Company B, 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Somerset, Kentucky. To W.T. Bascom, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter stating that he had been informed that Major E[paphras] L. Barber's resignation had been accepted by General [Don Carlos] Buell, leaving Barber's position vacant, that Barber was a fine officer, and he did not believe the place could be filled with anyone who would do the position as much credit, that Barber was forced to resign because of difficulties which had sprung up in the regiment since they came into Kentucky, that he thought Colonel [Edwin D.] Bradley and Quartermaster [Converse L.] Chase, as well as Adjutant [Erastus H.] Leland, ought to have remained at home for all the good they had done since they had been in service, that it was outrageous the way they had been used and treated by Bradley, Chase, and Leland, that it was almost impossible to keep Colonel [Edward H.] Phelps from handing in his resignation, that Phelps and Barber came to him and said he must apply for the appointment to the position held by Barber, and that they would write the necessary recommendations, that he was entitled to the position from the fact that he was the senior Captain, that while Steedman Scott and scores of others from Henry County and other counties in northwestern Ohio had asked for and obtained regimental positions, he had asked for nothing, that he believed himself better entitled to some position than those mentioned, that he preferred to raise a company and did so, that he was only asking for what was right, that Bascom knew he had always been true and active in Henry County, and that he thought Bradley, Chase, and Leland would be forced to resign. Bears a note from Choate mentioning their great victory [Mill Springs], and stating that the body of [Felix K.] Zollicoffer lay at their headquarters and was to be sent down the river to Nashville. Also bears a note dated January 27, 1862, from Bascom to Governor David Tod, stating that he had known Choate for many years, that Choate was one of the first citizens of Henry County, Prosecuting Attorney, and in all elements of character, a most worthy man, that Choate had promptly raised a company and had been in the service ever since, and that Choate was eminently worthy of the position.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 205]

January 23, 1862
L.C. Counsellor, Lieutenant, 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Circleville, Pickaway County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that the morning report numbered 8 men mustered into service, that he wished to know whether a man who had signed his name to an enlistment roll could be held as a soldier, that he had enlisted and swore in a man who had signed an enlistment roll and was not satisfied to go with the individual who originally enlisted him, and that the Lieutenant who originally had this man's name signed to his enlistment roll now wanted to take him away. Bears a note stating that signing the enlistment roll in the hands of a Lieutenant mustered in was mustering and held the party.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 88]

January 23, 1862
Charles A. DeVilliers, Colonel, 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Point Pleasant, Virginia. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that desiring only the welfare of his regiment and the public service, he again wrote on the subject of the vacant field office in the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he presumed Buckingham would readily concede that of all persons, he should be the one best able to judge as to the fitness in qualifications, competency, administrative ability, etc., of the officers of his regiment, and therefore be able to select a man who deserved and would honor the position should such an individual be found among his officers, that there were good officers in the regiment capable of doing good service in the places they held, but he knew of only one who was qualified for the position of Major and most respectfully urged his appointment, that he spoke of Lieutenant J[oshua] H. Horton, that Horton was perfectly versed in all the workings of the machinery of battalion, regiment, or brigade, that Horton possessed a thorough knowledge and understanding of the regulations and military acquirements of a high order, that Horton was a strict disciplinarian, that he felt confident Horton's claims would not be overlooked any longer, that Horton was the working man of the regiment, and he knew that his appointment, with few exceptions, would give entire satisfaction to men and officers, that Horton had never asked for any position and did not now, that as he knew exactly what should be done in this case, he strenuously urged Horton's promotion, that he learned that J[ohn] C. Drury had a conditional promise of the Majorship of the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he did not wish to interfere with Drury's prospects, but Drury had most shamelessly broken written promises to both General [Jacob D.] Cox and himself, that his leniency and Drury's resignation were all that saved Drury from disgrace, that Buckingham could readily see that Drury's appointment would not do at all and only result in injury to Drury and the regiment, that he trusted Buckingham would give him the credit of doing only that which he knew to be for the best and that no consideration could induce him to recommend any but the proper person for a responsible position, that presuming such would be Buckingham's mind, he expected a Major's commission for Joshua H. Horton, that some of his officers were very much opposed to him because he enforced discipline, and he presumed Buckingham was aware of this, that he did not look upon their work as a "holiday exhibition", that without proper restraint upon all and the enforcement of military law, they could do nothing, that while he was the commander in name, he would be in fact, that he enclosed Drury's written promise which he was sorry to say was repeatedly broken, and that General [Jacob D.] Cox had a similar promise which was written the day after their attack on the rebels on Cotton Hill.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 192]

January 23, 1862
A.J. Gardner, Gilead, Wood County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the 68th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered to Camp Chase and would probably be paid there, that if Tod would do by the 68th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry as he did by the 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry in getting them to send their money home, it would be a good thing for their families, that Company H belonged to their place, that he was examining Surgeon of about half the company and was acquainted with all, and that if Tod could get them to collect some of their money and Tod sent it to him, he would see that it was faithfully paid as directed.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 51]

January 23, 1862
Oliver D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Extract from Special Orders No. 19, stating that the resignation of Captain Samuel B. Jackson, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was accepted to take effect from January 23, 1862. By command of Brigadier General [Don Carlos] Buell.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 31]

January 23, 1862
John D. Jones, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that his son, 2nd Lieutenant Frank J. Jones of Company E, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, had been the Adjutant of the regiment for some time, that his son wrote to him from Bacon Creek, Kentucky that there was a vacancy of 1st Lieutenant in Company A and that he was entitled to it by seniority of rank, that his son had the confidence and esteem of Colonel W[illiam] S. Smith and the whole regiment, that his son had been in the service nine months and was anxious for the promotion, and that one eye was equal to two ears; enclosing his son's photograph and last letter by which Buckingham could form some idea of his son's merits; and requesting that Buckingham return the photograph and letter with the commission if he thought his son was worthy of it.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 71]

January 23, 1862
W[illiam] R. Lloyd, Colonel, 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Headquarters, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that at the time the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and the 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry were consolidated, the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was at Warren, Trumbull County and the 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was at Hillsborough, Highland County, that under Buckingham's directions, the reports of the battalion at Hillsborough were sent to Buckingham's office instead of to the headquarters of the regiment, and that consequently, no report of that battalion had ever been made to him; suggesting that this battalion report to the regimental headquarters so that their books might be properly made up and consolidated reports sent to Buckingham's office; and stating that by Buckingham's orders, the battalion of the 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry remained at Hillsborough, and that they would continue to do so until otherwise ordered.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 49]

January 23, 1862
Joseph McCutcheon, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp King, Kentucky, Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that on January 18, he enlisted George Myres and reported the facts to Buckingham on January 20, that said recruit was missing, and that from what he was lead to believe, Captain [Rodolphus] Robbins of Company I, 55th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had furnished Myres with a pass to Norwalk and induced him to join his company; asking what he was to do; and stating that if such conduct was tolerated, recruiting would be a rather uncertain business.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 24]

January 23, 1862
T.J. Maginnis, A.M. Huston, and E.S. Colborn, District Military Committee, and E. Rose, John H. Kelly, and Philip F. Wiseman, County Military Committee, New Lexington, Perry County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending D.W.D. Marsh as a suitable and competent person to fill a position as Captain or any other position of like grade; and stating that they had known Marsh for some years and believed him eminently qualified for such a position, that Marsh had taken a very active part since the commencement of the war in the enlistment of men for the service, that Perry County, with a voting population of less than four thousand voters, had sent nearly nine hundred men into the field, that there had not been an officer in the army appointed from Perry County, with the exception of Captain L[yman] J. Jackson who had recently been promoted to Major of the 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that they thought it was due Perry County that there should be at least one appointed to fill some place in the army when there seemed to be appointments made nearly daily.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 59]

January 23, 1862
John H. Mathers, Secretary, [Shelby County Military Committee], Sidney, Shelby County, Ohio. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter stating that Captain [Seneca] Hale recruited his men under an understanding with the Adjutant General's Department that if he recruited his men and they desired to be transferred to the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the Adjutant General's Department would transfer them, that Hale had recruited his number and mainly upon the idea held out by him and others to the effect that they would be assigned to the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the greater portion of the Shelby County volunteers were in that regiment, that Hale's men were unanimously and anxiously desirous to go into the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that the committee respectfully and earnestly desired that they be placed in that regiment.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 40]

January 23, 1862
Nathan Pickett, Captain, and F.T. Gilmore, Lieutenant, 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Washington. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter stating that Captain Oscar L. Jackson had reported to them that volunteers, instead of being paid from the day of their enrollment as they were given to understand, were to be paid from the day of the muster of the enrolling officer, that in the case of their two companies, this made a great deal of difference and would cause no little dissatisfaction, that many of their men were enlisted in August and September, that Captain Pickett received his appointment on September 28, 1861, and Lieutenant Gilmore received his on October 1, 1861, that both were mustered in on October 15, 1861, and that under the arrangement as reported by Jackson, the larger number of men in their companies would lose two months or a month and a half of pay; asking if the time of their muster could date back so as to save the Privates their pay, or at least a part of it, which otherwise they must necessarily lose; and stating that they hoped something might be done to avoid serious difficulty which would ensue if Privates were compelled to lose so much of their expected pay.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 58]

January 23, 1862
F[rederick] Poschner, Colonel, 47th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that having a vacancy for a 2nd Lieutenant in the 47th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he recommended Sergeant A[lexander] Campbell to Buckingham's consideration.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 213]

January 23, 1862
C.L. Russell, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter enclosing certain papers in regard to the appointment of his brother as Colonel in one of the Ohio regiments; stating that upon trial, Tod would find his brother all he claimed; and requesting that Tod inform him by return mail if his brother was appointed.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 116]

January 23, 1862
J.V. Stevens, Lieutenant, Quartermaster, 4th Regiment, Virginia Volunteers, Ceredo, Wayne County, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he desired to enter the artillery arm of the service from Ohio, that this had always been his favorite branch in connection with the army, although he was at present serving with the infantry, that he had been in the field in western Virginia nearly seven months and now held a position on the staff of Colonel J.A.J. Lightburn of the 4th Virginia, that his reasons for quitting the Virginia and entering the Ohio service were two fold, that he thought the change would afford him better facilities for aiding in bringing this fraternal conflict to a speedy and honorable termination, and that he wanted to change the sedentary habits connected with duties in his present office for the excitement and activity resulting from the proper discharge of new ones better adapted to suit his temperament; and asking upon what condition, in the way of enlisting men, could he have a commission to command a battery of artillery. Bears a pencilled note stating "no more Batteries to be raised."
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 157]

January 23, 1862
A[llen] G. Thurman, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter enclosing part of a letter from Miss Ella Watts in behalf of her brother, Arthur Watts, now a Sergeant in Company M of the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry; and stating that he retained the remainder of the letter which related principally to other matters, that Arthur Watts was a nephew of General James T. Worthington and General Thomas Worthington and was one of the young men of families of fortune and distinction who did not hold back for a commission, but went at once into the ranks, that he would be gratified to see a Lieutenant's commission given to Arthur, that he wished to say a word in behalf of Major Moore of Colonel [William E.] Gilmore's regiment, that this regiment, now in camp at Chillicothe, had been or was to be consolidated with one at Marietta, that Moore wanted to be the Major of the consolidated regiment, that he had known Moore for about twenty years and could freely say that he believed him to be a man of much intelligence and uncomon energy and efficiency, that Moore was a man of high standing and he believed him to be an excellent officer, and that he sincerely hoped that Moore might retain his commission. Bears a note from Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham stating that there were but two Lieutenants to a cavalry company.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 23]

January 23, 1862
Thomas M. Ward, 2nd Lieutenant, 67th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had the pistol holsters and a part of the saddle cloth together with the pocket compass of General Robert Garnett taken at the battle of Carrick's Ford, Virginia; asking if Buckingham would accept these articles on behalf of the State of Ohio; and stating that he was attending to his duties in recruiting, but few were enlisted, and that he trusted by faithfully discharging his duties, he might meet with Buckingham's approbation.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 68]

January 23, 1862
Charles Winslow, et. al., Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter signed by four individuals; stating that they were informed that Captain David A. Russell of the U.S. Infantry would accept the appointment of Colonel in an Ohio regiment; recommending Russell to Tod's favorable consideration; and stating that they had known Russell for more than twenty years, that Russell entered West Point in 1841 and graduated in 1845, that Russell was with General [Winfield] Scott in the Mexican War during the whole of that campaign, that for gallant conduct on several occasions in that campaign, Russell received the commendation of his superior officers, that for the last ten years, Russell had been in active service on the frontier, and that Russell was a good officer of good habits and excellent character.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 117]

January 23, 1862
M.B. Wright, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that Colonel [Frederick] Porschner of the 47th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was in Cincinnati and informed his son that no vacancies had occurred in Company H, and that Porschner thought that the wrong assignment had been occasioned by a mistake in the numbering or lettering of the companies at the Adjutant General's Department; asking if it would not be best to order his son to report himself at once to Porschner so that Porschner might attach him to the proper company; and stating that Porschner declined doing this now because he had not received official affirmation of his son's appointment or been brought in any official relation to his son.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 54]

January 24, 1862
F.W. Bingham, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that when Tod was in Cleveland, the law relating to soldiers' allotments of pay had not been published, that as it contemplated for compensation a deduction from the same, he had dropped the subject, that he was desirous of a position connected with the service, that if Tod's inclination was to give a preference to written applications, he was on the right track, that should there be a position at Tod's disposal and he received it, he would do his best to make it "a good appointment", and that Tod's message was considered in Cleveland to be the one for the times.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 177]

January 24, 1862
E[dwin] D. Bradley, Colonel, 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Somerset, Kentucky. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter stating that the resignation of Major E[paphras] L. Barber had been accepted; and suggesting the name of Captain M[oses] R. Brailey, 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a suitable person to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Barber.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 185]

[January 24?, 1862]
H[enry] Camp, Captain, Company B, 65th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, et. al. To ? Letter signed by thirty officers of the 65th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that having learned that Colonel C[harles] G. Harker had been recalled to a position in the regular army by the War Department, thereby rendering the position of Colonel vacant, and knowing Lieutenant Colonel Daniel French to be a man of military experience and in every way worthy to fill the position, they most earnestly urged French's appointment to the position of Colonel of the 65th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 198]

January 24, 1862
G. Volney Dorsey, and W.B. McLung, [State] Senator, 12th District, Treasury Department of Ohio, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Captain John G. Mitchell, Company C, 3rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry now in Kentucky, entered the service early as a Private, that by energy and attention to duty, Mitchell worked his way to his present position to which he was raised by the unanimous voice of the officers and men of his company, that should Colonel [Isaac H.] Marrow be promoted to a Brigadier Generalship, Lieutenant Colonel [John] Beatty, who would probably succeed Marrow, would recommend Mitchell for Major of the regiment, that they desired to add their earnest endorsement of said recommendation, and that they had known Mitchell from childhood and knew him to be capable of filling the position with honor to himself and benefit to the service.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 172]

January 24, 1862
W.E. Finck, Senate Chamber, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he was advised that an application was on file from Perry County requesting a regimental appointment for D.W.D. Marsh, that he was well acquainted with Marsh and knew him to be a man of energy, good business qualifications, and good habits, that Marsh's appointment would be valuable to the service, that Perry County had about 800 men in the army and only one regimental appointment, and that he trusted Tod would find it compatible to the service to give an appointment to Marsh. Also signed by William H. Holden, House of Representatives.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 181]

January 24, 1862
J.C. Foster, 53rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Diamond, Jackson, Jackson County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that as far as recruiting thirty men was concerned, he did recruit thirty men and another man reported them, that he expected some justice in the matter, that he abided Buckingham's decision without a murmur and would go as a Private, that since their election, he had been sworn in as a Private, that his men had been reported already and could go for disbursements of about forty dollars, that as for reporting, he did report every day until he had permission from Buckingham to join with the other man, and that if this other man did not report for both of them, there was some foul play somewhere.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 50]

January 24, 1862
John Geary, Book and Job Printing House, Northeast Corner High and Broad Streets, Office of Daily and Weekly Capital City Fact, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that in both the morning papers, they found General Orders Nos. 1 and 2, that in relation to this matter, they desired to say that the Capital City Fact claimed, as a matter of right and justice, at least a portion of Buckingham's patronage and did publicly believe it was due them without asking for it as a favor, that the Capital City Fact was the first paper in Ohio that "put on foot" the formation of a Union Party, under which administration Buckingham was now acting, and it gave that party a warm and unqualified support, that the Capital City Fact was also the official paper of the Ohio Legislature and the only paper in the State that published the official proceedings of that body, that in view of these facts, they again called Buckingham's attention to this matter, and that they hoped Buckingham would see the justice of bestowing his patronage on the Capital City Fact.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 33]

January 24, 1862
H[enry] H. Giesy, Captain, Company F, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Lyon, Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio. To ? Letter certifying that Thomas Kewish was regularly mustered into the service of the United States in Company F, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that he was now absent from camp without leave and had been for the past ten days. Bears the endorsement of T[homas] Worthington, Colonel, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 82]

January 24, 1862
William E. Gilmore, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that at the suggestion of his friend, A.G. Thurman, he was presenting certain facts, that he was the first man in Ross County and one of the very first in Ohio to enroll his name for the war, that on April 16, 1861, he had enrolled a full company which was offered to and accepted by the Governor, that being ordered to Camp Jackson soon afterwards, they were regimented as the 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that without seeking the place, he was elected by a large majority to the Colonelcy over several officers who were seeking it, that feeling unprepared to take a place of so much responsibility, he endeavored in vain, both before and after election, to prevail upon Colonel King (an experienced man) to take the position, that under these circumstances, he accepted the office and had tried to perfect himself in his duties and to perform them fully, that he had three months of hard service in Roan County, Calhoun County, Gilmer County, and Braxton County, Virginia, that he was publicly complimented by Brigadier General [William S.] Rosecrans for having done his duty well, that Governor [Francis H.] Pierpont consequently offered him the command of the 2nd Virginia Regiment and subsequently the 3rd Virginia Regiment, that these offers were communicated to Governor [William] Dennison with a request for permission to accept, that Dennison refused this leave, desiring him to retain command of the 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that upon the expiration of the three months' term, he was reappointed to the position for the three years' term, that he returned home to reorganize the regiment on August 19, 1861, that on that day, his wife died, that he consequently lost some days in starting the new companies at a time when men were most readily obtained owing to the fact that the old regiments were just mustered out, that six or seven regiments were organizing all around him and the 73rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was soon commenced in the same town, that because he refused permits to some drunken and incompetent officers in the three months' service, he was abused, slandered, and much retarded, that he still recruited men rapidly for his regiment, that his reports to the Adjutant General would show that he had raised more than enough men to fill a maximum regiment, that some seven companies had been taken from him by the action of the Governor and other means over which he had no control, that on October 17, 1861, he was asked by the Governor to consent to a consolidation with Colonel C[rafts] J. Wright to enable the 13th Missouri to be rated as an Ohio regiment, that anxious to get into the field and to oblige Governor Dennison, he consented, that this project failed and he went on recruiting, having lost much by the consolidation in time, men, and "headway", that on November 16, 1861, he was again stopped by an order consolidating his men with those of Colonel [Otto] Burstenbinder, that he yielded to this, accepting a second place again, that there were too many men in the two detachments and this order was annulled, that again he started, but was again stopped by being consolidated with Colonel [Newton] Schleich, that this too was countermanded from some cause unknown to him, that he was then distinctly promised that he should have thirty days uninterrupted time and that upon enrolling 600 men, his position would be assured, that ten days after, he was ordered to consolidate with Colonel [W.] Craig's regiment, that although he had 600 men and Craig less than 400, he again was required to take a second place, that to this he again acquiesced, knowing Craig to be an educated military man and believing him to be capable, that Craig had now resigned and he learned, to his utter astonishment and great mortification, that another exception was to be made against him, that instead of his succeeding regularly to the command, an officer from abroad and unknown to both detachments was to be placed over him, and that this seemed to be a direct condemnation of his conduct in office and was already so construed by some; asking if he could, in honor, remain in the service under such circumstances, and if Tod would do so under similar circumstances; stating that he had worked hard and zealously, and at very considerable sacrifice of his own limited means, that he had fulfilled the conditions under which his position was to be secured, that he was devoted to the service and begged Tod to reconsider the matter, that the proposed course would ruin the regiment just as the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ruined by the same means, that the men of both the 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and 63rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry were excited and displeased and would be utterly demoralized by the proposed course, that if he was given command of the 63rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry with either Bennett or Kinney as Lieutenant Colonel, he promised that if Tod found anything to disapprove of in the drill, discipline, or efficiency of the regiment, he would promptly resign the command without a murmur, and that he would sooner lose his life upon the field than be subjected to the mortification of being superceded in command under the circumstances noted; and citing references.
4 pp. [Series 147-24: 189]

January 24, 1862
S[eneca] Hale, Piqua, Miami County, Ohio. To J.H. Hart, Adjutant, 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Letter enclosing a copy of a letter from Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham to Colonel [Rodney] Mason, 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry in which Buckingham states that he found a promise in writing, which he had forgotten, that if Hale could fill his company in two weeks, he should be assigned to the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that Hale had the 18 men enlisted for the Benton Cadets, that under the promise, these men had enlisted and the company was full, and that if Hale returned the rolls completely, he did not see how he could refuse to fulfill his promise. Bears a P.S. from Hale stating that the Adjutant General handed him the letter in his office and requested him to show it to Mason.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 74]

January 24, 1862
W[illiam] B. Hazen, Colonel, 41st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Louisville, Kentucky. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter protesting against outsiders being appointed officers in his regiment; stating that he had taken great interest in his regiment and had labored early and late to instruct and make it efficient, that it was his deep interest for the welfare of the regiment and the good of the service which prompted him to write, that in every regiment of thirty officers, there would be at least ten or twelve who must inevitably fail to make efficient or even respectable military men, that there were many Sergeants who did as much towards recruiting a company as some of those who were elected to be officers, that they went into the ranks with the expectation of fast promotion if their competitor failed, that he had anticipated all these things and, upon the organization of the regiment, he put some twenty of the brightest non-commissioned officers at their books and had instructed them most thoroughly in all the duties of company officers, that he had five or six among them who would stand in the first section if they were cadets, that the just expectations of promotion had been the great stimulus to these young men and he could not see places given to others without a remonstrance in their behalf, that there were several in the regiment who had shown their inability to be officers and he was anxious to see them put aside to give room to the meritorious Sergeants, that after all his labors to instruct them, he did not feel at liberty to favor their displacement to make room for persons who were not known to be suitable for officers, who would be immensely below his Sergeants in instruction and discipline, and who would be looked upon by the entire regiment as interlopers, that he could not help but look upon it as a poor requital for his own labors to make it necessary for him to commence anew the labor of months to teach this outside "trash", and that he was about to call for a board of officers to decide who in the regiment should be kept in service; asking if vacancies made by this board or by resignation would be filled in accordance with recommendations of the proper military authorities in the field or if the vacancies were to be filled by persons outside of the regiment who had no claim to them; and stating that if the latter was the case, he would prefer to retain these inefficient men rather "than to incur the evils, etc."
4 pp. [Series 147-24: 64]

January 24, 1862
J[esse] Hildebrand, Colonel, 77th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he called on Major McCray at Cincinnati in regard to the recruiting service and was informed that the 77th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was not yet turned over to the United States and that all action and authority must come from Buckingham's department to recruit for regiments not full; inquiring as to the proper course for him to pursue under the present circumstances, as to how expenses were to be paid, etc.; and stating that his morning field report showed about 890 men, which included all who were at Marietta, sick and deserted (many of whom would never be fit for duty), and that he had not over 800 good, healthy men. Bears a note stating that Hildebrand should detail a commissioned officer for each company which needed recruits and have them recruit, that Hildebrand should draw up orders for these officers and send them to Buckingham for approval, and that these officers could then recruit as 1st Lieutenants.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 92]

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