Link to Online Collection Catalog
Link to OHS HOME page
Link to CONTACT OHS page
Link to OHIO HISTORY STORE website
Link to OHS CALENDAR page
Link to OHS PLACES page
Link to OHS RESOURCES page
Link to the ABOUT OHS page
Link to SEARCH OHS page
OHS home


CIVIL WAR
DOCUMENTS


ARCHIVES/
LIBRARY


ONLINE
RESEARCH
TOOLS

ONLINE
DOCUMENTS

ONLINE
SERVICES

SERIES 147. VOLUME 24. ADJUTANT GENERAL.
Correspondence to the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio,
May 28, 1861-February 3, 1862.

May 28, 1861
L[ewis P.] Buckley, Captain, et. al., Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To ? Letter signed by twenty-four officers of the 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service); agreeing to hold themselves jointly and severally responsible to Leland's Band for the sum of six hundred and eighty-five dollars per month for the term of three months.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 147]

July 27, 1861
L.A. Sheldon, Brigadier General, Headquarters, 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Ohio Volunteer Militia, Elyria, Lorain County, Ohio. To ? Letter stating that Lieutenant David W. Houghton was authorized to receive enlistments of men in the 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Ohio Volunteer Militia for the artillery service of the United States, that if a company was formed, they would elect their own officers, and that if part of a company was formed, they would join with other squads in the elections of officers pursuant to General Order No. 26 of the Adjutant General of Ohio.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 50]

September 11, 1861
William Dennison, Governor of Ohio, the State of Ohio, Executive Department, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Major General John C. Fremont, St. Louis, Missouri. Copy of a letter stating that the bearer, Captain Erasmus Gest of Cincinnati, who he had sent to Missouri on special service with the Ohio volunteers, was a gentleman of high personal character and intelligence and of much practical ability, that Gest had for some years been a railway engineer and was well educated in that profession, that he had instructed Gest, in conjunction with the officers of the Ohio regiments of infantry and the companies of cavalry and artillery, to give such attention to the wants and necessities of the soldiers as might be calculated to add to their efficiency by promoting their health, comfort, and morale, that Fremont would greatly oblige him by affording every consistent facility for the prosecution of the purpose of Gest's appointment, and that he trusted Fremont would in all respects approve said purpose.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 10]

September 11, 1861
William Dennison, Governor of Ohio, the State of Ohio, Executive Department, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Captain E[rasmus] Gest, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Copy of a letter stating that he desired Gest to report himself immediately to Major General [John C.] Fremont at his headquarters and as soon thereafter as practicable, to Colonel [John] Groesbeck of the 39th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to Colonel [John W.] Fuller of the 27th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to Captain [John S.] Foster of the 4th Independent Company, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and to Captain [Thomas J.] Carlin of the 2nd Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, and Captain [Louis] Hoffman of the 4th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, that Gest was to confer freely with the Ohio officers named and, in such manner as might be agreeable to them, afford the Ohio soldiers in Missouri whatever care, assistance, or attention might be deemed necessary for their efficiency in the service and their health and morale in the camp or on the march, that Gest was to keep the Executive Department fully advised of his orders and labors, that Gest would make no expenditures or incur any liabilities on account of Ohio without special orders from the Executive Department, and that in all cases where expenditures might be deemed necessary, Gest would report promptly to the Governor of Ohio, furnishing full information as to the causes, character, and amount of the expenditures.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 10]

October 22, 1861
T[homas] Worthington, Colonel, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter recommending Reverend Elijah Kuhns as a fit person for Chaplain of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 200]

October 29, 1861
W[illiam] Dennison, Governor of Ohio, The State of Ohio, Executive Department, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Letter enclosing the application of 2nd Lieutenant John F. Cutler to be allowed to re-enter the service of the U.S.; and stating that Cutler came to him well recommended and he believed the public service would be promoted by granting his application, and that he hoped Cameron would favorably consider Cutler's request. Bears a note dated November 5, 1861, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D.C., stating that authority was granted for Cutler to re-enter the service by orders.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 51]

November 8, 1861
John C. Drury, Captain, Company H, 11th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Gauley, Virginia. To Colonel C[harles] A. Devilliers. Letter stating that he regretted exceedingly the occurrences of the previous evening, and promised that a similar condition of himself would never occur again while he remained in the army.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 191]

November 23, 1861
David McIntosh, S.E.M. Kneeland, Samuel D. Harris, Jr., Alphonso Hart, and H.L. Carter, Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by members of the Military Committee of Portage County; recommending Isaac B. Riley who desired the appointment of Quartermaster in the 45th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry or some other regiment, or some other post in which he might be able to serve the country; and stating that Riley was a young man of fine ability and sterling integrity, and that Riley would do honor to himself and the country in any position to which he might be assigned.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 179]

November 29, 1861
Alphonso Hart, Central Committeeman of 18th Congressional District, Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that Isaac B. Riley of Portage County was desirous of obtaining a position in the Quartermaster Department of the Army, that he took pleasure in recommending Riley as a gentleman eminently qualified for that or any other position which might be sought by him, that Riley was a civil engineer by profession, that when the rebellion broke out, Riley was occupying a lucrative situation in the State of Arkansas and was compelled to abandon it or be disloyal to the government, that Riley left immediately and came to Ohio, that Riley was well known to the citizens of Portage County, having resided in Aurora Township, that all who knew Riley bore testimony to his high character, integrity, and ability, and desired to see him placed in some position which would be remunerative to him and where he could be of service to his country, that Riley was a gentleman of good practical talent and unimpeachable honesty, and that Riley would be true and equal to every trust placed in him by the government.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 179]

December 9, 1861
James H. Lord, Captain Lord's Company, Colorado Volunteers, Canon City, Colorado Territory. To Governor David Tod (Uncle). Letter introducing the bearer, James Graham, an old mountain friend, who was leaving the Colorado Territory that day for his home in Cincinnati; and stating that he had been intimately acquainted with Graham since residing in the territory, that it gave him great pleasure in being able to recommend Graham as a gentleman in whom he had the most implicit confidence, that after Graham arranged his business in Cincinnati, he wished to enter the army, that he considered Graham a good military man and fully competent to fill any office in a regiment, and that Graham would give Tod all the news from the territory.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 113]

December 12, 1861
J.M. Noble, et. al., Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Copy of a letter signed by fifteen citizens of Cincinnati; requesting the appointment of Josiah H. Stratton of Company B, 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to a Lieutenancy; and stating that Stratton was a young man of respectable family and excellent habits, that Stratton had a superior education, that Stratton was among the first volunteers, having been in the three months' service, and that Stratton re-enlisted for the war. Bears a note stating that for some unaccountable reason, Stratton was not presented to Governor William Dennison, and was now respectfully tendered to Governor David Tod.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 229]

December 16, 1861
Leavitt L. Bowen, Denver, Colorado Territory. To Dear Judge. Letter stating that the bearer, [James] Graham, bore his note to the Judge as an introduction, that Graham had resided in the Colorado Territory, and was well and favorably known as a gentleman in every way competent and reliable to discharge any duties he might undertake, and that Graham visited Ohio and Cincinnati for the purpose, among other things, of getting a position in the army; instructing Timothy to take a little wine for his stomach's sake and other infirmities; and stating that he would be pleased to have Timothy write, and that he would visit Cleveland and perhaps Cincinnati. Bottom portion of letter missing.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 113]

December l6, 1861
John Coon, Paymaster, U.S. Army, Keith & Coon, Attorneys, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that they wished to unite in calling Dennison's attention to Captain David A. Russell of the 4th Infantry in the regular army, that Russell graduated from the Military Academy in 1845, served with much credit through the Mexican War, and since then had been constantly in the service on the frontier and on the Pacific coast, that Russell was now with a part of his regiment near Washington City, that Russell was a resident of Cleveland when appointed a cadet, that Russell was well known as a gentleman of uncommon abilities and a fine officer, and that feeling assured the public would derive great advantage from Russell's promotion to the command of a volunteer regiment, they recommended Russell for such promotion.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 5]

December 17, 1861
Octavius Waters, Chairman of Fulton County Military Committee and Member of the 5th Congressional Military Committee, Delta, Fulton County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he understood that Major E[paphras] L. Barber was about to resign or had resigned his position in the 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry now in Kentucky, that the appointment of Barber was the only one Fulton County had received although she had sent 800 men to the field, and that two companies of the 38th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry were from Fulton County; and requesting that Captain M[oses] R. Brailey of Fulton County and the same regiment be promoted to the vacancy should it occur.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 185]

December 23, 1861
Peter J. Sullivan, Colonel Commanding, Headquarters, 48th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter recommending J.P. Williams of Cincinnati for the post of Quartermaster in the 48th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that Williams was highly recommended by several prominent Union men in Cincinnati, that William A. Breman of Cincinnati had been acting Quartermaster in the regiment for some time and would have been continued, but for his want of energy and ability to perform the arduous and trying duties of the position, that two of the government mules had been lost from the regiment, and that he was not now prepared to say who was at fault.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 2]

December 30, 1861
A[lbert] S. Hall, Major Commanding, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Wickliffe, Kentucky. To Adjutant General L[orenzo] Thomas, Washington, D.C. Letter stating that pursuant to Section XIII of General Order No. 105, dated December 3, 1861, he herewith reported the number of men now composing the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry stationed at Camp Wickliffe as being 34 officers and 873 enlisted men, making a total of 907, that the number of recruits required to bring the regiment to the maximum number was 139, that the regiment had been in the service in western Virginia in the Cheat Mountain Department during the entire Summer and Fall campaigns, had a good many men in hospital, and had a good many on detached service, leaving only 794 for duty at present, and that it was highly desirable that the regiment should be recruited to the maximum number at the earliest practicable moment. Bears a note dated January 25, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D.C., referring Hall's letter to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 62]

December 31, 1861
C.P. Buckingham, Adjutant General, Ohio, Headquarters, Ohio Militia, Adjutant General's Office, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Adam R. Eglin, 2nd Lieutenant, 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Kenton, Hardin County, Ohio. Form letter notifying Eglin that he had been appointed by the Governor of Ohio as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; instructing Eglin to immediately signify to the Adjutant General's Department his acceptance or non-acceptance of the appointment and if he accepted, to report in person without delay to Colonel James Cantwell at Camp Simon Kenton near Kenton; and stating that as soon as the 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was completely organized and mustered into the service, Eglin's appointment would be confirmed and his commission issued. Bears a note dated January 26, 1862, from Lieutenant A.R. Eglin, Columbus, to Colonel James Cantwell, stating that learning that the interest of the service and the harmony of his company would be promoted by his resignation, he hereby most cheerfully tendered it to Cantwell, and that he was truly grateful for Cantwell's uniform kindness. Also bears a note dated January 26, 1862, from James Cantwell, Colonel, 82nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, acknowledging receipt of and accepting Eglin's resignation.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 170]

[December 31, 1861]
P.W. Van Winkle, Captain, 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Headquarters, Camp Crittenden, Hillsborough, Highland County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter recommending the appointment of Oliver S. Glenn, 1st Lieutenant, and George W. Doggett, 2nd Lieutenant in his company. Bears the endorsement of William O. Collins, Lieutenant Colonel, and John O. Ferrell, Major, 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 48]

January 1, 1862
Erasmus Gest, Captain and Former Aid to the Governor of Ohio, Saint Louis, Missouri. To Governor David Tod. Copy of a letter stating that the transfer, in conformity with the constitution and will of the people, of the duties of Governor of Ohio to Tod made it proper for him to say that on September 11, 1861, he was commissioned Assistant Commissary of Subsistence with the rank of Captain by then Governor William Dennison, that by a letter of the same date (copy enclosed), he was accredited to Major General J[ohn] C. Fremont, commanding the Department of the West, that in pursuance thereof and with Dennison's letter of instructions (a copy of which was enclosed), he repaired to Saint Louis where he had since resided subject only thus far to the orders of the Governor of Ohio, that if he was accredited as Tod's aid de camp to the Department of the Missouri, he should be furnished with a letter to Major General Henry Halleck, commanding, and also a letter of instructions, that in the former letter, it was desirable that Tod should expressly request that Gest be furnished by Halleck with such an order as would secure transportation for himself from post to post, that he extended his best wishes for Tod personally, that he hoped Tod's administration of the duties of State might be eminently successful, and that there would be an early restoration of the "recusant" States to their former peaceful relation and a termination of "this causeless war", and that as they were strangers, he referred Tod to the Honorable William Dennison and the Honorable William Groesbeck.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 13]

January 1, 1862
W[illiam] B. Hazen, Colonel, 41st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Wickliffe, Kentucky. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that Captain Emerson Opdycke of the 41st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had performed his duties as an officer, since the formation of the regiment, in a manner so highly creditable and efficient that he had thought it due the service and Opdycke that he call the Governor's attention to Opdycke as a worthy person for promotion, that Opdycke was thoroughly competent to fill the position of field officer in a regiment or to bring up a regiment in thorough drill and instruction, that Opdycke had been detailed by the officer commanding the brigade to the command and instruction of one of the regiments, and that this had been conducted in a highly efficient manner. Bears a note from Milo S. Hascall, Colonel Commanding, 15th Brigade, stating that he knew of no person more entirely worthy of promotion than Opdycke.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 215]

January 2, 1862
William L. Hoyt, Adjutant, and J[ames] A. Jones, Colonel Commanding, 25th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Huttonville, Western Virginia. Report of the condition of the 25th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry stationed at Huttonville, Western Virginia, containing the number of commissioned officers and enlisted men present for duty, on extra or daily duty, sick, under arrest or confinement, on detached service, and on leave. Bears a note dated January 22, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D.C., referring the report to the Governor of Ohio with a request that he furnish recruits herein deficient.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 56]

January 3, 1862
W[illiam] H. Free, Captain, Company D, 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp near Somerset, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that his object in writing was to ask that bravery and patriotism be rewarded, that Captain Lyman J. Jackson of Perry County was the first man in the county to take a stand and come out boldly in defense of the Government, that Jackson raised a company of volunteers and served in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), that after Jackson returned home, he immediately raised another company which he now commanded in the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that Perry County had eight companies in the field, that not one regimental officer had been appointed from Perry County while other counties, which had done comparatively little according to the population, had numerous regimental officers, that they thought this was unkind on the part of Governor William Dennison, that if they had men who were good enough to make up the rank and file, they certainly had some few who were capable of being field officers, that they certainly ought to have one man from Perry County with enough military knowledge to don a double breasted coat and straddle a horse, that he thought Jackson was the man and would have been promoted long ago if Dennison had done him justice, that Jackson was a Democrat and perhaps that had some weight with Dennison, that he was told there would likely be a vacancy in the 62nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Perry County had three or four companies in that regiment, that if it should become necessary to appoint any regimental officer in the 62nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he hoped Tod would be kind enough to take into consideration the claims of Jackson, that by so doing, Tod would much oblige many citizens of Perry County, and that any information Tod wanted in reference to Jackson's character and military qualifications could be supplied by the Honorable W.E. Finck, Senator from Perry County.
3 pp. [Series 147-24: 108]

January 3, 1862
Lyman J. Jackson, Captain, Company G, 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Somerset, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that his name was presented to Governor William Dennison as a proper subject for appointment to a regimental position, that the application was made in the latter part of December 1861, and it requested his appointment in the 62nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry for the reason that several companies of that regiment were raised in Perry County and were partly officered by men who served in a company commanded by him during the three months' term, that the principal argument or reason urged was that Perry County had about eight or nine hundred volunteers in the army and no regimental officer at all, that having been absent, he did not see the request for his appointment, that in the reply to the application (premised by the statement that Perry County deserved a regimental officer), it was noted that there were no vacancies, that the appointments were permanent, and that the subject would receive serious consideration, that the idea that any appointment was "permanent" was in conflict with all precedents of the organization of regiments in Ohio until the appointees were mustered into service, that vacancies could easily have been found, that to be taken into "serious consideration" was to fail or at most, in Scripture language, to be "taken in", that originally he had little desire for such a change, but he hated the idea of failure, that he had little time or means to expend in a continuance of the attempt and few friends to represent him before Tod, that consequently, he had to ask that Tod examine the papers presented to Governor William Dennison on his account and act on them as deemed proper, that if he was worthy and Perry County deserved a compliment which his appointment would give, and Tod could find a vacancy, then he should be appointed, that if not, he at least asked that Perry County be remembered for her volunteers in any way satisfactory to her citizens and soldiers, that he once found a vacancy in volunteering as a private soldier, that the company offices were vacant and he was elected Captain, that he had been filling that position since April 27, 1861, and that if he had done his duty (and he had tried to), he thought his claim to a vacancy ought to be at least equal to those who never saw active service nor the camp fires of the rebels.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 107]

January 4, 1862
J[ohn] M. Connell, Colonel, 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Somerset, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he was informed that Captain Lyman J. Jackson of the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and formerly a Captain in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), was suggested as a suitable officer for promotion and recommended for a field office in one of the regiments now being organized, that Jackson was in every respect well qualified for such a position, that Jackson had experience, character, and intelligence to recommend him, that Jackson was distinguished in all of the essential qualities for a good field officer, that the good of the service would be promoted by Jackson's appointment, and that he would be pleased to see such officers as Jackson, with the proper qualifications, promoted to field offices in place of the political appointees who heretofore had received appointments on account of political influences.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 109]

January 4, 1862
J[ames] W. Stinchcomb, Captain, Company B, 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp near Somerset, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he understood that Captain Lyman Jackson of the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was an applicant for a regimental appointment, that he had been acquainted with Jackson for a number of years and knew him to be a man of good moral character with more than ordinary ability, that he and Jackson were both Captains in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service) in western Virginia during the previous Summer, that for a large portion of the time, Jackson's company and his were in a separate detachment, and that Jackson was a brave soldier, a good disciplinarian, and fully competent to discharge any regimental office he might be appointed to, and in that capacity would be of value to the service.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 106]

January 5, 1862
A[lbert] S. Hall, Major Commanding, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Wickliffe, Kentucky. To R[obert] W. Taylor, Auditor of State. Letter asking what had become of the Lieutenant Colonel of the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that they were informed on December 20 that F[rederick] C. Jones of Cincinnati was appointed to the vacancy, that Jones had not yet reported himself, that if Jones had experience, they wanted him to drill them, that if Jones did not have experience (as reported), they wanted to drill him, that they wanted to see the distinguished civilian sent to command the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that her old commander thought he had Captains fit for the place and so recommended, but it appeared the Governor thought otherwise, that he was afraid the failure to see his fitness was due in part to his warm espousal of Lieutenant Stratton's cause last Spring, that the regiment had been under his command for nearly a month and all their battalion drill was his work, that they were second to no regiment at Camp Wickliffe in the evolutions of the line, that Colonel Stanley Mathews of the 51st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry thought that Jones was already a Lieutenant Colonel in some other regiment and had only been transferred to the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that if so, Jones might not have received notice of the transfer, that Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham was well acquainted with his standing in the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and in the estimation of Colonel [Jacob] Ammen, now commanding the 10th Brigade, that if this was only a transfer, the Colonel and the entire regiment would much prefer his promotion to the Lieutenant Colonelcy and the promotion of Captain Henry Terry of the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to the Majorship, that for his part, he cared nothing about it save that he had won the recommendation at the cannon's mouth and as such was entitled to it, that he was, however, not overly ambitious in this service, that there was not yet energy enough in it, that there was too much parade, review, and delay, that he must gravitate to whatever place he filled, that justice to Terry entitled him to promotion, and transferring a new man into the regiment seemed to cut him off, that if Taylor could spare a moment to let the new Governor into the secrets of this matter, he thought full justice would be done them, that the regiment was to move shortly and he was the only field officer in it, and that it was of the utmost importance for the places to be filled at once by someone present for duty.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 210]

January 6, 1862
L.F. Drake, Camp Somerset, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had resided in Perry County for the last two years, that Perry County had raised and sent forth nine companies of infantry since the commencement of hostilities, that these men were as good and true as were now in the U.S. Army, that Perry County had raised and sent forth a regiment minus one company and there was not a commissioned field officer among them, that why this was he could not tell, that he trusted it was not because Perry County had always been Democratic, that the citizens of Perry County had been knocking at the door of the appointing power in order that someone now in the service from that county might be appointed to the office of Lieutenant Colonel or Major, that as far as he could learn, they had selected Lyman J. Jackson, a graduate of a school in Perry County and a lawyer of fair talents, that Jackson was the first individual who raised a company of men for the three months' service and the first individual who laid the foundation for men to be raised for the three years' service, that he had been acquainted with Jackson for nearly three years, that he served with Jackson in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service) in the capacity of Chaplain, that he had an opportunity of knowing Jackson's capability and popularity, that he could state that Jackson was highly esteemed by all the officers and private soldiers, that he was currently acting as Chaplain in the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and it was his opinion and the opinion of many others in the regiment that Jackson would fill either of the offices mentioned to the entire satisfaction of all concerned, that it was hoped Jackson might be promoted as he justly deserved, and that Jackson was twenty-seven years of age, and had a good constitution and a good voice to command.
4 pp. [Series 147-24: 109]

January 7, 1862
Lyman J. Jackson, Captain, Company G, 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Somerset, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Tod had probably received, per the Honorable W.E. Fink, a letter from him relative to an appointment in his favor, that he had declined intercession by any except a few who had been companions in arms and the members of the Ohio Legislature from Perry County, that whether the latter had interested themselves for or against him, or not at all, he did not know, that Tod now had all the facts he wished to present, that he could not and would not approach Tod with other influences, that if he was successful, he would be gratified and the mutations of life might yet allow him to reciprocate the favor, and that if not, he was still in for the war with all his energies and would use them faithfully in whatever position his superiors should see fit to allot.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 108]

January 7, 1862
O[scar] F. Moore, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 33rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Jefferson, near Bacon Creek, Kentucky. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that since David W. McConnell, 1st Sergeant, Company K, 33rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had shown himself well qualified and deserving, he recommended that McConnell be appointed 2nd Lieutenant to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Enos A. Holmes, late 2nd Lieutenant in Company K, 33rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Bears the endorsements of O[rmsby] M. Mitchel, Brigadier General, D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding Department, and J[oshua] W. Sill, Colonel Commanding, 9th Brigade.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 184]

January 8, 1862
John F. DeCourcy, Colonel, 16th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Clay, Lexington, Kentucky. To Assistant Adjutant General, Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Kentucky. Letter stating that in forwarding the resignation of Captain S[amuel] Smith of the 16th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he begged to recommend that it be accepted, that should Smith's resignation be accepted, he recommended the promotions of 1st Lieutenant W[illiam] P. Van Doorn to be Captain, 2nd Lieutenant P[hilip] M. Smith to be 1st Lieutenant, and Orderly Sergeant B[enjamin] F. Heckert to be 2nd Lieutenant, that the named officers and non-commissioned officer all belonged to the company commanded by Captain S. Smith, that they were not the seniors in their respective ranks, but in recommending them for promotion, he did so advisedly, and that they belonged to one of the best companies in the regiment and the excellent discipline of said company would be best preserved by the promotions he now recommended. Bears a note dated January 10, 1862, from D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding, Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, to the Adjutant General of Ohio, forwarding the letter with the recommendation that the promotions and appointments be made as soon as possible.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 226]

January 11, 1862
F. Kinsman, and H.B. Perkins, Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that their friend and neighbor, Emerson Opdycke (now a Captain in the 41st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry), had manifested so much efficiency in his position as an officer that his friends united with him in requesting his promotion to a field officer position, that Opdycke was in every way reputable in his deportment, integrity, and habits, that of all the officers mustered into service from Warren, they knew of none who bore a better record, that they had confidence Opdycke would fill with credit any field office which might be assigned him, that they were happy to know Opdycke had won the highest confidence and respect of his superior officers, and that they cheerfully, and with great confidence, recommended Opdycke's promotion. Bears the endorsement of L. Smith.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 217]

January 11, 1862
John H. Mathers, Clerk, Shelby County Military Committee, Sidney, Shelby County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that S[eneca] Hale held a commission as recruiting officer in Shelby County for the 71st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and had some men already enlisted, that Hale wished to be transferred to the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and the Shelby County Military Committee most cordially and earnestly seconded his request, that the committee believed if Hale was transferred to the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, he would be enabled to fill up his company without much further delay because the Benton Cadets, of whom two companies were from Shelby County, being disbanded, were now at Sidney and anxious to go into the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry where the rest of the Shelby County companies now were, that there was a general feeling throughout Shelby County that their boys should be together in the same regiment, that given these views, the committee believed the interest of the service required the change to be made, and that very little recruiting would be done unless the change was made. Bears a note from Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham stating that if Hale could fill his company in two weeks and the men desired to go into the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, they would be transferred, and that Hale was said to have 18 men.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 34]

January 11, 1862
J[ames] D. Wallace, Major, H[enry] S. Clement, Captain, Company A, C[arr] B. White, Colonel, R[igdon] Williams, Captain, Company F, R[obert] N. Shoemaker, Lieutenant, Company A, and W[atts] McMurchy, Captain, Company C, 12th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Warren, Charleston, Virginia. To ? Letter certifying that Edwin R. Grim, a Sergeant in Company A, 12th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, had fulfilled the duties of his office with honor to himself and his country; recommending promotion for Grim; and stating that Grim was a gentleman and a soldier true to his cause and the Union.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 63]

January 12, 1862
J[ohn] M. Connell, Camp at Somerset, Kentucky. To the Honorable George Pugh, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Letter stating that he was making an effort to secure the appointment of Pugh's brother, William, to a Lieutenancy in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the former application failed because there was then no vacancy, that one existed now and he had recommended Pugh's brother for appointment again, that he thought Pugh's personal intercession with Governor David Tod would insure William's appointment, that William had been with the regiment for some weeks, and for more than a year had exhibited such correctness of deportment as to assure even his enemies of his perfect and thorough change of life and conduct, and that he had no hesitation in asserting that the day of "boyish jolly" with William had passed forever.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 220]

January 12, 1862
F.B. Landis, Lieutenant and Quartermaster, 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Hamilton. To Captain Fred Myers, Assistant U.S. Quartermaster, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter requesting 980 U.S. regulation blankets, 61 Sibley tent stoves, 10 bugles or coronets, 980 small spoons, and 980 large spoons for the 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Bears the approvals of Lewis D. Campbell, Colonel, 69th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Governor David Tod. Also bears a note dated January 13, 1862, from Myers to Captain John H. Dickerson; instructing Dickerson to furnish the 61 stoves and 10 bugles; and stating that the regiment was near Cincinnati and consequently, transportation on these supplies would be saved. Also bears a note from John H. Dickerson, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster; stating that there were no stoves on hand and he had orders not to purchase them, and that the bugles would be sent.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 154]

January 13, 1862
William H. Gibson, Colonel, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Wood. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that by the resignation of Timothy Wilcox, a vacancy occurred in the 2nd Lieutenancy of Company F, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that John Kessler, Orderly of the same company, had proven himself an efficient, active, and faithful officer, that Kessler's habits were "unexceptionable", that he was confident Kessler would fill the office of Lieutenant with credit to himself and advantage to the service, and that he therefore asked that Kessler be appointed 2nd Lieutenant of Company F, 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Bears the endorsements of R[ichard] W. Johnson, Brigadier General, A[lexander] McD[owell] McCook, Brigadier General Volunteers Commanding, and D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding the Department.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 212]

January 13, 1862
W[illiam] H. Pugh, 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp near Somerset, Kentucky. To the Honorable A. McVeigh, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter stating that Colonel [John M.] Connell forwarded a recommendation that he be commissioned as 1st Lieutenant to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Lieutenant [Jacob] Humphries, that the necessity for an immediate appointment was very great, that the remaining officers of the company were sick and they had no one to command them, that they expected to have a fight there very soon, and that his former recommendations were handed to Governor [William] Dennison and he presumed were placed on file; and requesting McVeigh to see the Governor, explain who he was, and give him a good word. Bears a note from McVeigh to Governor David Tod, stating that he desired Pugh to receive the commission.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 221]

January 14, 1862
A.D. Kibbee, Farmington, Trumbull County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Jacob Strohm of Farmington was now a member of Company D, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry in the capacity of company Quartermaster (a position worth about seventeen dollars per month, which was some eleven dollars less than Strohm was told it was worth by the Honorable J[ohn] Hutchins at the time he enlisted), that Strohm was a man of more than common ability, had been admitted to the practice of the bar in Trumbull County, and was doing quite a fair business at the time of his enlistment, that he was told by the members of his company that Strohm had made a good proficiency in military drill since they had been in camp, that Strohm wanted a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry so that if a vacancy should occur, he might stand a chance for promotion, that he felt considerable sympathy for Strohm, that Strohm was poor and had a family dependent on him for a living, that he did not doubt Strohm would honor the position he sought to occupy, and that he would be obliged if anything in the line indicated could be done for Strohm.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 27]

January 14, 1862
William H. Lytle, Louisville Hotel. To the Honorable Samuel Hagy. Letter requesting that Hagy hurry up the commissions for his regiment in the Adjutant General's office; stating that several had arrived, but not all, and that he supposed the recommendations were on file; referring Hagy to a recent letter of his to Governor David Tod on the subject; stating that he was especially desirous of having Alfred Pirtle commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant, and that no time should be lost as they might soon be in front of the enemy; and asking if they had no Brigadiers in Ohio for Ohio troops, or if none could be manufactured.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 7]

January 14, 1862
J[esse] Meredith, Captain, Company C, 26th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Ashley, Delaware County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that on account of former acquaintance, he was addressing Tod on a delicate subject, that he entered the service in May of 1861 as commander of a company, that it was not expected by his friends at the time that he would be compelled to serve long as a foot soldier, that his age and experience as a military officer seemed to indicate a different position, that as he did not belong to the relative or political family with the appointing power, he was yet on foot, that although he had been solicited by his commanding officers to make application for promotion, he had heretofore refrained from doing so, trusting to merit alone to procure his proper position, that Colonel [Edward P.] Fyffe of his regiment had seen fit to send him the accompanying certificate, that at the same time, Fyffe requested that he set a time to meet him at the executive office for a personal conference on the subject, that the date of January 16 was set, but as their regiment had been ordered from Virginia to Kentucky, they would be deprived of the pleasure of meeting Tod and must be content with writing, that Colonel [Ephraim R.] Eckley would give him any recommendation requested, that he had served as a military officer nearly all his life and had held every position from 1st Lieutenant to Brigadier General, except Lieutenant Colonel, that he dismounted his horse at the commencement of the Mexican War, fell into the ranks, and was elected Captain in that service, that he now had served through one campaign in the rebellion as Captain of Company C, 26th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he had stood the fatigue well so far, but found that he was too far advanced in life for a foot soldier, and that he would be sixty on April 10, but would leave it for Tod to say whether he should serve on in his present position while men without military knowledge or experience were appointed over him.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 28]

January 14, 1862
E.H. Moore, Athens, Athens County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he felt a delicacy in addressing Tod at a time when so many new burdens were placed upon him, but was impelled to it by an earnest desire to promote the efficiency of the volunteer force, that the promotion of Captain C[harles] H. Rippey of Logan, Hocking County, Ohio (currently in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry) to a Majorship or Lieutenant Colonelcy would be in the interest of the common cause, that Rippey had a broad and deep substratum of common sense, and a fine mind, that Rippey was well-cultivated, cool, and far-seeing, that Rippey's education was of a high order, that Rippey was a superior mathematician, both by nature and culture, that Rippey had every mental qualification for a military man of the first rank, that Rippey understood how to manage men, and always command the respect, obedience, and love of those under him, that Rippey was qualified by experience, that nearly a year ago, in response to the President's first call, Rippey enlisted in Logan, Ohio, that Hocking County had a strong anti-war and rebel sympathizing party which was especially bitter at the out set of the troubles, that Rippey faced this in private and on the stump, and by his efforts, contributed largely to the organization and strengthening of the Union Party in Hocking County, that Rippey was elected to a 2nd Lieutenancy by the first company organized in Hocking County, that with this company, Rippey served in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service) during the western Virginia campaign, that Rippey won the respect and confidence of all by his faithfulness and fearlessness in the performance of duty and his zeal in pursuit of military knowledge, which led him to improve his leisure time in studying the science of war and perfecting himself and the company in drill, that Rippey returned with his men when the term of their enlistment had expired, that so great was Rippey's popularity with his men and the people of Hocking County and so great was their confidence in his ability, that the command of a company was forced upon him, that Rippey took this company into the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he had been serving in Kentucky, that Rippey was now at Somerset in General [Albin F.] Schoepf's division, that Rippey was universally popular with the men, and could bring strong, satisfactory testimonials from his fellow officers, that Rippey's company was full to overflowing and he had applications for admissions to his ranks almost continually, that this by itself spoke everything in Rippey's favor, that Rippey loved the service and expected to devote himself to it as long as his country needed a soldier, that Rippey was diligent in study, and ambitious to master the science of war, that Hocking County was cursed with a strong and bitter anti-war party, that notwithstanding this, through Hocking County's loyal citizens, she had responded nobly to her country's call, having nearly one thousand men in the field, that Hocking County was entitled to a Majority of a corps of regimental officers, that Hocking County had only one field officer, F.F. Rempel, that the people felt justly aggrieved, and were anxious to be more largely represented and to be represented by men qualified by nature, education, and experience, that consequently, they were desirous that Rippey be promoted to a position worthy of his past service and unquestioned ability, that men were ready and anxious to volunteer under Rippey as soon as this could be effected, that Rippey's many friends in Athens County, and especially in Athens where he pursued his collegiate studies, were desirous of his appointment as Major or Lieutenant Colonel of some good regiment and pledged their hearty cooperation in leading men to his command, that he was confident Rippey would honor the State in either of these capacities, and that he respectfully and firmly pressed Rippey's case for Tod's favorable and early consideration.
4 pp. [Series 147-24: 223]

[January 14?, 1862]
A[lexander] White, Logan, Hocking County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the friends of Captain [Charles H.] Rippey of the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry would apply to Tod for Rippey's promotion and had requested him to write Tod on the subject, that he did so with great pleasure as he had known Rippey long and intimately, that there was no one within the whole circle of his acquaintances more worthy of promotion than Rippey, that Rippey was a thoroughly educated, high-toned, and most gentlemanly young man, that Rippey was devoted to his studies, that he understood Rippey was desirous of remaining in the army as a profession, that Rippey had been in the service ever since the present unhappy troubles broke out, that upon his return, Rippey immediately raised a company for the same regiment, that Rippey was a favorite with his regimental officers, who pronounced him to be, without exception, the best drilled officer in the regiment, that Rippey was well fitted to discharge the duties of Major or Lieutenant Colonel, and that despite furnishing over 800 men for the service, Hocking County had only one field officer; and asking if they did not deserve something.
2 pp. [Series 147-24: 224]

January 14, 1862
A[lexander] White, James W. Crooks, and J[oseph] C. Toole, County Military Committee of Hocking County, Ohio, Logan, Hocking County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter suggesting the promotion of Captain Charles [H.] Rippey, 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry now at Somerset, Kentucky; and stating that Rippey was a young man of rare literary attainments and a graduate of Ohio University, that Rippey had an unblemished moral character, that Rippey served as a Lieutenant during the three months' service in the same regiment in which he now commanded a company, that Rippey merited and received the credit of having discharged his duties faithfully and creditably during the arduous service through which the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry went in the three months' campaign in western Virginia, that Rippey was devoting himself soul and body to the service, that it was admitted by all of the officers of Rippey's regiment, as well as by all others who knew him, that he was not excelled as an officer by any in his regiment, and that they believed by promoting Rippey, not only would justice be done to the merits of a gallant officer, but that the interests of the service would be materially promoted.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 225]

January 15, 1862
T[imothy] R. Stanley, Colonel, 18th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Jefferson, Kentucky. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that 1st Lieutenant R[obert] R. Danford of the 18th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned and his resignation was to take effect when accepted, that in anticipation of such acceptance, he desired to recommend the promotion of 2nd Lieutenant William B. Williams to be 1st Lieutenant and also the promotion of Orderly Sergeant Charles M. Grubb to be 2nd Lieutenant, and that Williams and Grubb were good officers of Company F.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 218]

January 16, 1862
S[ilas] A. Burnap, Captain, 7th Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To George B. Wright, Quartermaster General, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter stating that he had 120 men in camp and would be filled up to the maximum number in a few days, and that he had no blanks of any kind, company books, stationery, army regulations, or books for instruction; requesting that Wright send him all he was entitled to of each with invoice and duplicate receipts; and stating that he would sign receipts and return them by the first mail.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 18]

January 16, 1862
G[eorge] E. Pugh, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To the Honorable W.S. Groesbeck, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter stating that his brother, William H. Pugh, was disappointed in his efforts to raise a company for the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but went to Kentucky with Colonel [John M.] Connell, at his suggestion, as a mere civilian without rank or pay and had been there in that condition, that General [Albin F.] Schoepf sent William to Governor [William] Dennison with dispatches (six or eight weeks ago) and with a letter asking a commission for him as Lieutenant in order that Schoepf might put him on the brigade staff, that this letter was accompanied by a recommendation to the same effect from all the field officers of Connell's regiment and Steedman's regiment, that he told William to file those papers in the office of the Adjutant General at Columbus, which he supposed was done, that Colonel Swayne took great interest in the affair, but the application failed because there was no vacancy in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry at that time, and that Connell now wrote saying there was a vacancy and that he had recommended William for appointment; enclosing Connell's letter; requesting Groesbeck to ask Governor David Tod to oblige; and stating that Brachman would go with Groesbeck and perhaps other colleagues would go, that William was in the action with [Felix K.] Zollicoffer's forces the previous Fall and attracted the favorable notice of Scoepf who desired to appoint him as aide, and that if the papers were on file, Groesbeck would find that he had not overstated the case.
3 pp. [Series 147-24: 222]

January 17, 1862
I[saac] N. Alexander, 1st Lieutenant, Company A, 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Lyon, Ohio. To ? Letter certifying that on or about November 15, 1861, Reverend Elijah Kuhns put in his possession a paper to which was attached the names of A.G. Sharp, Captain, M.C. Lilley, 2nd Lieutenant, Ed Upton, Lieutenant, and William Nesler, 2nd Lieutenant, that said paper nominated and recommended Kuhns for the Chaplaincy of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that said paper had been lost or mislaid, and that he had made diligent search and could not find it.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 199]

January 17, 1862
N.B. Baker, Adjutant General, State of Iowa, Adjutant General's Office, Des Moines, Iowa. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter requesting that the Adjutant General of Ohio forward to the Governor of Iowa a copy of the report last made, or about to be made, by the Adjutant General of Ohio; and stating that his report would be ready within a fortnight, and the courtesy requested of the Adjutant General of Ohio would be extended by Baker's department to the Governor of Ohio.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 14]

January 17, 1862
N.B. Baker, Adjutant General of Iowa, State of Iowa, Adjutant General's Office, Des Moines, Iowa. To the Adjutant General of Ohio. Letter requesting the Adjutant General of Ohio's annual report and copies of all printed orders which could conveniently be spared; and stating that the report of his department would be published within a fortnight and sent to the Adjutant General of Ohio.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 15]

January 17, 1862
R[alph] P. Buckland, Colonel, 72nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, et. al., Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by sixteen individuals; and stating that Peter Kessler of Fremont, Ohio was a suitable person to be commissioned as a Lieutenant of infantry, that Kessler had served as Orderly Sergeant of Company G, 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), and that Kessler possessed sufficient military abilities to warrant the appointment of Lieutenant.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 188]

January 17, 1862
T[homas] J. Cochran, Lieutenant and Adjutant, 77th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that Colonel [Jesse] Hildebrand instructed him by letter from Columbus to omit sending morning field reports to Buckingham, but to continue furnishing one daily to General [Melancthon S.] Wade, that Wade ordered that Buckingham should also be reported to daily, and that for this reason, Buckingham did not receive their reports on January 14 and 15; asking if Buckingham still required those reports; stating that by order of Hildebrand, he made no morning field reports on Sundays until January 1; and asking if, in the consolidated morning report books, he should begin to transfer at the mentioned date or from the time he was detached to act as Adjutant. Bears a note stating that he should report daily.
1 p. [Series 147-24: 87]

CIVIL WAR DOCS ||  NEXT

HOME || CONTACT

 ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || MARKETPLACE || LINKS || SEARCH
Ohio_Historical_Society - 1982 Velma Ave. - Columbus, OH 43211 - © 1998 All Rights Reserved.