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SERIES 147. VOL 1A. ADJUTANT GENERAL.
Correspondence to the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio
April 17-November 15, 1861.

April 17, 1861
William Dennison, Governor of Ohio, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Beriah Magoffin, Governor of Kentucky. Copy of a letter introducing Thomas M. Key (a Democratic member of the Ohio Senate from Hamilton County, and a native Kentuckian), and expressing his hope that "nothing may occur to interrupt the kindly and neighborly feeling" of the people of Ohio and Kentucky. To this end, Dennison sent Key to confer with Magoffin.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 61]

April 20, 1861
William Dennison, Governor, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Hon. Thomas M. Key. Telegram informing Key that he was gratified to learn that Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin's purposes were peaceful, and that he was ready for "instant" communication with Magoffin if there was any aggression by citizens of either state.
1 p. [Series 147-1A: 62]

April 20, 1861
Thomas M. Key, Louisville, Kentucky. To William Dennison, Governor of Ohio, Columbus. Copy of a telegram informing Dennison that he had a "satisfactory" meeting with Governor Beriah Magoffin, that Magoffin's policy was "friendly and prudent", that Magoffin wanted "instant" communications between the two governors if there was any aggression by citizens of either state, and that Kentucky was arming for defense and to maintain her present neutrality.
1 p. [Series 147-1A: 63]

April 21, 1861
Salmon P. Chase, Washington. To Governor William Dennison. Letter informing Dennison that communications were cut off and that the government in Washington was doing everything possible to defend the capitol, instructing Dennison that he must defend Cincinnati, and stating that he has learned from the Secretary of War that the War Department had ordered four regiments of the Ohio contingent to Cincinnati. The letter was written a week after the surrender of Fort Sumter, and Washington was isolated due to the rioting in Baltimore which had cut Washington off from the North via the railroad.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 28]

April 23, 1861
Thomas M. Key, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To William Dennison, Governor of Ohio. Letter informing Dennison of the result of his interview with Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin on April 20, 1861. Key states that he had a "protracted" conversation with Magoffin, that he conveyed Dennison's regret should any circumstance threaten the "good understanding" and "friendly relations" which had always existed between Ohio and Kentucky, that he conveyed Dennison's determination to prevent any act of aggression by citizens of Ohio against Kentucky as well as Dennison's intention to devote all of Ohio's resources to the support of the Constitution and laws of the United States and federal policy, that Magoffin hoped for a continuation of peaceful relations between Ohio and Kentucky and was resolved to permit no action which could be perceived as threatening the safety of Cincinnati, and his belief that Magoffin would try to avoid any confrontation with Ohio until such time as the people of Kentucky had determined the final policy of their state with regard to the "existing troubles of the country."
4 p.[Series 147-1A: 63]

April 25, 1861
Andrew Gregg Curtin, Pennsylvania Executive Chamber, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. To Governor William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter introducing E.C. Biddle of Philadelphia who was serving as Curtin's messenger to Dennison, and requesting that Governor Oliver Perry Morton of Indiana and Dennison meet with Biddle.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 64]

April 27, 1861
Edward Ball, Washington, D.C. To Governor William Dennison. Letter containing an account of a visit to Washington, D.C. Ball provides information regarding the military situation at Harpers Ferry and the Arlington Heights, and states that he visited Salmon P. Chase and Simon Cameron, that Cameron was pleased with the appointment of George B. McClellan as major general, Ohio Volunteers, that Cameron would approve the transfer of Colonel Alexander McDowell McCook from the regular army to command of the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry if Dennison insisted upon it, that Cameron had written Dennison asking him to send four additional regiments and that troops offered over and above the first requisition would be accepted provided that they were willing to volunteer for the duration of the war, that there were 20,000 troops in Washington with another 20,000 expected, that mail services had been virtually suspended and that efforts were underway to arrange for the delivery of mail via Annapolis and New York, that many families had departed Washington, that there was a "great dearth" of office seekers, and that there was almost no way in or out of Washington except over the Annapolis Road which was in the possession of the military.
4 pp. [Series 147-1A: 1]

April 27, 1861
Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, War Department, Washington. To William Dennison, Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that Dennison's application for ordnance to be used at Cincinnati had been referred to the appropriate bureau, that Dennison's request to have a U.S. Army officer detailed to take command of the volunteer forces at Cincinnati had been referred to Lieutenant General Winfield Scott, that Ohio regiments in excess of the state's contingent could not be received at present, that Abraham Lincoln had authorized the raising of twenty-five additional regiments under the provisions of an 1846 act of congress, and that a portion of the Ohio volunteers not mustered in could enter the new regiments if they agreed to serve for three years or the duration of the war.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 29]

April 28, 1861
Aaron F. Perry, Continental House, Philadelphia. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he must go to Washington via Havre de Grace and Annapolis, that he had met with Governor Andrew Gregg Curtin, that Curtin had 19,000 troops, 20,000 stands of arms and orders from Abraham Lincoln for 25,000 more troops than first called for, that Curtin agreed with the plan and general views "we" aim at, that Mr. Biddle would be accompanying him to Washington in order to assist in pressing their objectives, that Curtin inferred that Abraham Lincoln had already commenced on a course of action similar to what they proposed, that Curtin said Baltimore had 20,000 good troops, and that Curtin was for "strong" work.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 3]

April 28-29, 1861
Copies of telegrams between William Dennison, Governor of Ohio, and Edwin Denison Morgan, Governor of New York. The telegrams relate to Dennison's request that Morgan attend a meeting with Andrew Gregg Curtin, Oliver Perry Morton, Richard Yates, Dennison, and George B. McClellan.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 66]

April 29, 1861
Edwin Denison Morgan, State of New York, Executive Department, Albany. To William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter forwarding the copies of telegrams described in the previous entry.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 66]

April 29, 1861
Edwin Denison Morgan, State of New York, Executive Department, Albany. To William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter forwarding copies of telegrams between Dennison and Morgan. The telegrams relate to Dennison's request that Morgan send a confidential messenger to the meeting described in entry 207-1A: 66.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 65]

April 30, 1861
T.L. Crittenden, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To William Dennison, Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that he had been instructed by Beriah Magoffin, Governor of Kentucky to seek the assistance of Dennison and Oliver Perry Morton, Governor of Indiana in arranging a truce between the federal government and the seceded states until the U.S. Congress could meet in extraordinary session.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 67]

April 30, 1861
T.L. Crittenden, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To William Dennison, Governor of Ohio. Letter enclosing the communication described in the previous entry, and stating that he was at a loss to explain why the special train provided for Governor Beriah Magoffin at Lexington had not arrived in Covington.
1 p. [Series 147-1A: 68]

April 30, 1861
Aaron F. Perry, Office, Annapolis Telegraph Company, Annapolis, Maryland. To Governor William Dennison. Telegram stating that he was detained at Annapolis, that everything was under "strict" surveillance, that Dennison's ideas would be "strongly" backed, and that he expected to arrive in Washington that evening.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 2]

May 1, 1861
Amos Beckwith, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, United States Army, Washington City, D.C. To William Dennison, Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that Edward Williams and G.M. Baslable were employed by him to obtain beef cattle on the hoof for the troops in Washington, D.C., that Baslable had recently been in Ohio, that all beef cattle in the charge of Williams and Baslable were to be driven to Maryland and then introduced into Washington a few at a time, and that Williams and Baslable had within a few days delivered to him two or three hundred head. The letter bears a notation of approval from Winfield Scott.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 30]

May 1, 1861
Aaron F. Perry, Washington, D.C. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he had an interview with Salmon P. Chase, that he was satisfied no plan had yet been adopted, that the plan he brought would probably not be adopted unless there was pressure, that there was much inertia in Washington to overcome, that the "liberal" offers of New York and Boston to the U.S. Treasury were all "gammon", that New York and Boston would not take treasury notes except at a big discount, and that there had been a proposition from New York to organize a committee of safety to take possession of the federal government.
1 p. [Series 147-1A: 4]

May 2, 1861
Edwin Denison Morgan, State of New York, Executive Department, Albany. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he found it more than inconvenient to leave the state at that time, that he had asked his friend John Bigelow to attend the meeting in Cleveland proposed by Dennison to take place the next day, and that he was ignorant of the precise nature of the emergency for which Dennison asked a conference.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 69]

May 3, 1861
Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, War Department, Washington. To Governor William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter stating that he had received Dennison's letter dated April 27, 1861, and that he had referred Dennison's letter to Lieutenant General Winfield Scott since the matters it contained fell within the province of the Commander in Chief.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 31]

May 3, 1861
James A. Garfield, The State of Ohio, Executive Department, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter containing an account of a trip to Illinois. Garfield states that he visited Springfield and presented Dennison's requisition for five thousand United States muskets to Governor Richard Yates, that the Quartermaster General of Illinois immediately delivered the muskets to him, that he shipped the muskets to Columbus via the La Fayette, Indianapolis and Dayton Railroad for fifty-five cents per hundred weight, that he communicated Dennison's views in regard to the consolidation of the army of the Mississippi Valley under the command of Major General George B. McClellan to Yates, and that he had the honor to report that the plan met with Yates' full concurrence.
1 p. [Series 147-1A: 70]

May 5, 1861
Salmon P. Chase, Washington. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that Ohio had done "nobly" and must have the arms needed for her "gallant" men, that he would make every effort to get Ohio the needed arms, that he confessed a special depth of attachment for the state and the people to whom he owed so much, that he had called upon General Winfield Scott who was much gratified by the spirit in Ohio, that he tried to persuade Scott of the wisdom in taking possession of Alexandria and then advancing a force strong enough to hold Manassas Gap Junction in order to command the main railroad communications in Virginia, that Scott thought it unwise to take such action at present, that Scott intended to fortify Arlington Heights, send a large force into Fortress Monroe and probably retake Harpers Ferry, that he feared Scott underestimated the value of an interior movement like that proposed to capture and hold Manassas Gap Junction, that he believed the success of such a movement would result in an anti-secession majority when Virginia's popular referendum on secession was held on May 23, 1861, that Maryland was becoming loyal, that efforts were underway to secure the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, that Colonel James W. Ripley (Chief of the Ordnance Bureau) had told him it was impossible to provide arms beyond Ohio's quota, that there were not even half enough arms in the country to supply the troops willing to use them, that he hoped for the complete success of Abraham Lincoln's proclamation calling for 42,034 volunteers to serve for three years unless sooner discharged and eight regiments of infantry and one each of cavalry and artillery for the regular army, and that he was sure Ohio would furnish her full quota.
4 pp.[Series 147-1A: 33]

May 5, 1861
James W. Ripley, Ordnance Office, Washington. To Salmon P. Chase, Rugby House. Letter regarding a telegram from Governor William Dennison requesting more arms for Ohio. Ripley states that the number of arms already ordered to be supplied to Ohio exceeded the number of troops called out from that state for United States service, that he had ordered arsenal commanders to supply arms, accoutrements and ammunition for the contingents of the several states on requisitions from the officers who had been designated by the War Department to muster them into service, and that there had to be systems and uniformity of action to prevent confusion and ensure to each state a proportionate supply to the troops it was called on to furnish.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 32]

May 9, 1861
Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, War Department, Washington. To Governor William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter acknowledging receipt of Dennison's letter of May 4, 1861, requesting 25,000 muskets, 1,200 rifled muskets, and 1,300 Harpers Ferry muskets. Cameron states that arms and accoutrements could be furnished only to troops mustered into the service of the United States, that at least 15,000 muskets had already been furnished to Ohio while the total quota thus far called out by Abraham Lincoln from Ohio did not exceed 10,000 men, that he was declining Dennison's requisition, that it was not possible to meet all of the demands for arms without very soon exhausting existing supplies and making disproportionate distribution to different parts of the country, that the federal government had no Harpers Ferry rifles on hand, and that the small supply of rifled muskets was reserved for troops mustered to serve for the duration of the war.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 35]

May 9, 1861
Salmon P. Chase, Treasury Department. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he had met with Simon Cameron and William H. Seward, that the three agreed to go to Abraham Lincoln and recommend an enlargement of the call for three years volunteers, that Lincoln consented whereupon Cameron agreed to take three additional regiments from Ohio, that there was no policy other than good will towards Ohio in the War Department, that it was probable two more regiments from Ohio would be ordered to Washington, that he thought the remainder of the Western force would be employed on the Ohio and the Mississippi, that Colonel Anderson would organize the volunteers in western Virginia and Kentucky in place of the governors, that he trusted Major General George B. McClellan would look out for western Virginia and Cairo, that General Winfield Scott intended to send cadets to aid in drilling the three years volunteers as fast as enlisted, but could not spare them from Washington except for such volunteers, and that he was sending copies of his plans of organization for the three years volunteers and the regular troops.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 34]

May 14, 1861
Charles N. Lamison, Captain Commanding, Artificers at Camp Goddard, Camp Goddard, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. To Henry Beebee Carrington, Adjutant General Commanding, Ohio Volunteers. Letter stating that his company had arrived at Camp Goddard on May 13, 1861, that the men were actively engaged in preparing barracks, and that the barracks would be ready for reception of troops on May 15, 1861.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 37]

May 15, 1861
James Irvine, Colonel, 16th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Mathias H. Nichols, Captain, Company A, 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Abraham C. Cummings, Captain, Company D, 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Head Quarters, Camp Jackson, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Henry Beebee Carrington, Adjutant General. Letter regarding a court of inquiry convened to investigate the circumstances connected with an attempt of Private Walker L. Dixon to cross the line of sentinels at Camp Jackson resulting in Dixon being wounded and the shooting of Private Philip Deshler, Company A, 22nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry by Sergeant Jacob Farden of the same company.
3 pp. [Series 147-1A: 39]

May 15, 1861
Charles N. Lamison, Captain Commanding,Artificers at Camp Goddard, Camp Goddard, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. To Henry Beebee Carrington, Adjutant General Commanding, Ohio Volunteers. Letter stating that the health of the artificers under his command continued to be good with the exception of one man who was sick, that work on the barracks had been suspended that afternoon for want of lumber, that his men had set to work constructing a storehouse for the Commissary Department, that a sufficient supply of material was now provided, and that the barracks for troops would be finished that day.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 38]

May 18, 1861
George W. Andrews, Colonel, 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Commanding at Camp Goddard, Camp Goddard near Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. To Henry Beebee Carrington, Adjutant General, Ohio Volunteer Militia. Report of the camp commander. Andrews states that the 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had arrived at Camp Goddard on the evening of May 16, 1861, that they found the "beautiful" camp grounds "pretty well arranged" for the reception of troops, that the camp was "pleasant" and "commodious," that rations had been fully up to the contract in all respects and that not a "murmur" had been made on the subject, that the Quartermaster's Department had so far been well conducted, that the companies of the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had arrived on May 17, 1861, that there were a few men over two thousand currently in the camp, that they had not yet received any arms, that there was not a musket in the camp, that in spite of good discipline they must at least have enough arms for the guards, that they needed the necessary blanks to enable officers to make their reports, and that the health of the men was as good as could be reasonably expected.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 40]

May 20, 1861
George W. Andrews, Colonel, 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Commanding at Camp Goddard, Camp Goddard, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. To Henry Beebee Carrington, Adjutant General, Ohio Volunteers. Report of the camp commandant. Andrews states that the condition of affairs in the camp continued good except that there were a few more men on the sick list, that two or three cases of measles were noticed the day before and were taken immediately from the camp so as to prevent the disease from spreading, that the men with measles would be carefully treated in Zanesville and the surgeon expected them to speedily recover, that discipline was as good as could be expected without arms, that they had no guns of any kind in camp, that he was awaiting instructions regarding a company in camp commanded by Captain Henderson which had progressed little in the art of soldiering, that the 20th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was without field officers, that the rations continued to be good and that not a word of complaint had reached him on the subject, that the Quartermaster's duties were well and properly attended, that the surgeon wanted a hospital erected within the camp, that he proposed converting the "round house" (currently used as quarters by the officers and headquarters by himself) to a hospital, that it was "incomprehensible" to see how they had preserved discipline without arms, and that the entire force in camp numbered 1,969.
2 pp. [Series 147-1A: 41]

May 20, 1861
R.M. Corwine, Attorney at Law, Short's Building, Corner of Hammond and Fourth Sts., Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he had received Dennison's circular to the "Soldiers of Ohio", that Dennison's appeal would doubtless meet with a prompt response from many more volunteers than would be accepted by the federal government, that he regretted not being one whose reputation would be "brightened" by the war, that many of his personal friends were making "splendid" records for themselves, that Dennison was "especially benefited" by the war, that Dennison's defeat as senator was in many respects a "fortunate" circumstance, that Dennison might not have been able to make half the reputation which he now enjoyed in a whole senatorial term, and that Dennison had made a most favorable impression on Hoosier acquaintances.
3 pp.[Series 147-1A: 5]

May 24, 1861
William Dennison, Richard Yates, Oliver Perry Morton. Report of a meeting of the governors of Ohio, Illinois, and Indiana held in Indianapolis, Indiana. The governors state that they concurred in the opinion that the United States should at an early date take possession of four prominent points in Kentucky such as Louisville, Covington, Newport, and Columbus and the railroads leading south from those points, that United States regulars or volunteers from adjoining states should occupy those points if Kentuckians could not be found for this purpose, that they believed such action would save Kentucky for the Union and prevent secessionists from controlling the state, that Major General George B. McClellan should be given the necessary authority if their plan was approved, that the force called out in Major General George B. McClellan's Department should be "materially" increased, that they believed the loyalty of Kentucky should be secured before any movement south took place, that they pledged appropriations made by the legislatures of their states in aid of the General Government, that additional aid from their states could be relied upon to sustain the Government in the "vigorous" prosecution of the war, and that authority should also be given to occupy points in Tennessee and Missouri.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 71]

May 29, 1861
William Alfred Buckingham, State of Connecticut, Executive Department, Hartford. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that knapsacks and equipments for one thousand infantry had been sent by express, that he would send a bill when he had time, that the war was a "blessed contest", and that "God will carry us safely through".
1 p. [Series 147-1A: 75]

May 29, 1861
Edwin Denison Morgan, State of New York, Executive Department, Albany. To Governor William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter stating that he had received Dennison's telegram dated May 27, 1861, requesting five thousand knapsacks with infantry equipments, that they could not spare any knapsacks, that the first regiments of New York Militia ordered to Washington had been poorly supplied and that some had gone without cartridge boxes and other infantry equipments, that he had made contracts for supplies, that supplies had not kept up with demand since New York men had been mustered into service so rapidly, and that he trusted Dennison's apprehensions would prove to be "ill-founded".
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 74]

May 30, 1861
Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, War Department. Copy of an order of Abraham Lincoln. The order states that four regiments of troops organized under the authority of the Illinois legislature and the independent regiment at or near Chicago could report to Major General George B. McClellan and be mustered into three years service, and that McClellan could receive and attach to the same service any artillery and cavalry companies in Illinois not exceeding five in number provided that this did not entail the raising of new companies or the calling out of dormant ones under old organizations.
2 pp.[Series 147-1A: 36]

May 31, 1861
R.M. Corwine, Depot, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter requesting that Dennison provide him with a statement of the present condition of Ohio's volunteers as to numbers of three months and three years volunteers and where they were stationed, and stating that Dennison could address him at Willard's Hotel in Washington, D.C.
1 p.[Series 147-1A: 6]

June 2, 1861
R.M. Corwine, Willard's Hotel, Washington City. To Governor William Dennison, Columbus, Ohio. Letter stating that he had arrived in Washington the previous evening, that he had made many inquiries regarding the condition of the 1st and 2nd Regiments, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the men were "very badly off" for clothing and that some were in a "most deplorable" condition, that the men were literally in rags and were "mortified" and "broken" in spirit, that they were the subjects of the "jabs" and "jokes" of the citizens of Washington and commonly called the "pauper" regiments, that he assured the men that Dennison had no knowledge of their true condition and that Dennison had regarded them as exclusively under the jurisdiction of the federal government from the moment the government took charge of the regiments, that the apparent neglect of these regiments had induced many of the men to resolve not to volunteer for three years, that he had appealed to the men to suspend making their decision on re-enlistment until learning with some reliability whether they would be treated differently in the future, that the men appeared troubled because regiments from the New England states, New York, Indiana and other states were cared for by those states while Ohio seemed to neglect her regiments, that he regarded it as of the utmost importance to return the 1st and 2nd Regiments, Ohio Volunteer Infantry for three years, that these troops were well drilled and "most excellent" men, and that the federal government should agree to reimburse Ohio any money expended on clothing for her troops in Washington if he was unsuccessful in getting the government to provide the clothing.
5 pp.[Series 147-1A: 15]

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